Inspirational

Young children’s play allows them to explore, identify, negotiate, take risks and create meaning. The intellectual and cognitive benefits of playing have been well documented. Children who engage in quality play experiences are more likely to have well-developed memory skills, language development, and are able to regulate their behaviour, leading to enhanced school adjustment and academic learning (Bodrova & Leong, 2005).
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This video is an interview with Dr Andrew Meltzoff where his discusses the importance of play in early learning. He states that play is for for brain development and early learning. He suggests that parents should focus on interaction, stimulation and playing with their young children rather than trying to teach a lesson. He states that products such as Leap Frog won't boost a child's IQ and human interaction early on is much more important that these products.

This video is an interview with Dr Andrew Meltzoff where his discusses the importance of play in early learning. He states that play is for for brain development and early learning. He suggests that parents should focus on interaction, stimulation and playing with their young children rather than trying to teach a lesson. He states that products such as Leap Frog won't boost a child's IQ and human interaction early on is much more important that these products.

Here's a new series of short articles based on interviews with educators—Quality in rural and remote settings. The interviews provide a snapshot of other educators’ practices and insights, to generate ideas and reflection. http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/nqsplp/resources/case-studies/

Here's a new series of short articles based on interviews with educators—Quality in rural and remote settings. The interviews provide a snapshot of other educators’ practices and insights, to generate ideas and reflection. http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/nqsplp/resources/case-studies/

Young children are involved in making sense of the reading process long before they are actually able to read. (High Scope Preschool Child Observation Record p.32)

Young children are involved in making sense of the reading process long before they are actually able to read. (High Scope Preschool Child Observation Record p.32)

Have conversations with children about their experiences including listening to their point of view and non-verbal communications as children’s behaviour show how they are feeling. For example, acknowledging their efforts and frustrations, encouraging them and letting them know you are there to help if needed using words, smiles and hugs. Kidsmatter Early Childhood.

Have conversations with children about their experiences including listening to their point of view and non-verbal communications as children’s behaviour show how they are feeling. For example, acknowledging their efforts and frustrations, encouraging them and letting them know you are there to help if needed using words, smiles and hugs. Kidsmatter Early Childhood.

Write in front of children for a purpose–noting attendance, making lists and notes for home, labeling and creating signs. Provide reasons for writing and ask children to read what they have written. Talk about the differences between letters, numbers and random marks. Connors and van Nieuwkuyk, Essential connections Tasmanian Education Department.

Write in front of children for a purpose–noting attendance, making lists and notes for home, labeling and creating signs. Provide reasons for writing and ask children to read what they have written. Talk about the differences between letters, numbers and random marks. Connors and van Nieuwkuyk, Essential connections Tasmanian Education Department.

‘All children are artists. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.’ (Picasso) This is one of the favourite quotes on creativity and the challenge of remaining creative.

‘All children are artists. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.’ (Picasso) This is one of the favourite quotes on creativity and the challenge of remaining creative.

Plato said, ‘You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation.’   How and what do we learn from children (and adults) through their play? If we look closely enough, we should be able to see all five outcomes demonstrated.

Plato said, ‘You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation.’ How and what do we learn from children (and adults) through their play? If we look closely enough, we should be able to see all five outcomes demonstrated.

Children learn by figuring out action and reaction and cause and effect relationships; through observation; copying others, tuning out what’s irrelevant and by distinguishing what’s different and what’s the same; by trial and error, conceptualizing ideas and themes. - Centre for development and learning.

Children learn by figuring out action and reaction and cause and effect relationships; through observation; copying others, tuning out what’s irrelevant and by distinguishing what’s different and what’s the same; by trial and error, conceptualizing ideas and themes. - Centre for development and learning.

Take time to explain to other children what a child with additional needs can do and how they can be included in activities. Connors and van Nieuwkuyk Essential Connections, Tasmanian Education Department.

Take time to explain to other children what a child with additional needs can do and how they can be included in activities. Connors and van Nieuwkuyk Essential Connections, Tasmanian Education Department.

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