Women's Suffrage

December 18 2014 marks the 120th anniversary of the passing of the Women's Suffrage Act in South Australia. South Australia was the first Australian colony to give women the vote, and the fourth place in the world. The act also made South Australia the first place in the world where women could stand for elections. Items on this board celebrate this important anniversary.
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On 13 April 1869, Dugdale became the first Australian woman to publicly call for women’s equality with a letter published in Melbourne’s Argus newspaper.Dugdale also attacked Victoria’s court system for failing to take action on violence against women. She was credited as one of the women who led Australia to in 1902 become the second country to grant women the right to vote.

Henrietta Augusta Dugdale: Australian suffragist honoured by Google

Pioneering feminist founded country’s first female suffragist society and called for equal rights for women

In an address to the WCTU, Elizabeth Webb Nicholls states that the outcomes feared by some as being reasons to forego women's suffrage didn't ever come to pass.

In an address to the WCTU, Elizabeth Webb Nicholls states that the outcomes feared by some as being reasons to forego women's suffrage didn't ever come to pass.

This exhibit details a 'Strawberry Fete' which was used to raise money for the Women's Suffrage League. Part of an exhibition at Adelaide Town Hall to celebrate 120 years of South Australian women's suffrage.

This exhibit details a 'Strawberry Fete' which was used to raise money for the Women's Suffrage League. Part of an exhibition at Adelaide Town Hall to celebrate 120 years of South Australian women's suffrage.

Also on display at the Adelaide Town Hall are a series of extracts from letters to the editor of various newspapers around the time the vote was granted. These letters illustrate the range of views that were popular at the time.  On display at the Adelaide Town Hall as part of the 120th anniversary of suffrage celebrations.

Also on display at the Adelaide Town Hall are a series of extracts from letters to the editor of various newspapers around the time the vote was granted. These letters illustrate the range of views that were popular at the time. On display at the Adelaide Town Hall as part of the 120th anniversary of suffrage celebrations.

Here is a cartoon depicting Elizabeth Webb Nicholls as a lion tamer, keeping the lion (the Premier at the time, Premier Kingston) in line with the weapon of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU).  On display at the Adelaide Town Hall as part of the 120th anniversary of South Australian women's suffrage.

Here is a cartoon depicting Elizabeth Webb Nicholls as a lion tamer, keeping the lion (the Premier at the time, Premier Kingston) in line with the weapon of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). On display at the Adelaide Town Hall as part of the 120th anniversary of South Australian women's suffrage.

Mary Colton was another of the key suffragists in South Australia. She was a founder of the Adelaide Children's Hospital and remained on the board for the extent of her life. She was President of the Women's Suffrage League when suffrage was achieved in South Australia and also became known as the founder of the YWCA of Adelaide. Photo courtesy of the YWCA of Adelaide.

Mary Colton was another of the key suffragists in South Australia. She was a founder of the Adelaide Children's Hospital and remained on the board for the extent of her life. She was President of the Women's Suffrage League when suffrage was achieved in South Australia and also became known as the founder of the YWCA of Adelaide. Photo courtesy of the YWCA of Adelaide.

Rosetta (Rose) Birks was the Treasurer of the Women’s Suffrage League and first woman to vote in Glenelg. She was one of the key suffragists in South Australia. State Library of South Australia SRG 534 Box 4

Rosetta (Rose) Birks was the Treasurer of the Women’s Suffrage League and first woman to vote in Glenelg. She was one of the key suffragists in South Australia. State Library of South Australia SRG 534 Box 4

This image depicts Elizabeth Webb Nicholls, then President of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union of South Australia (WCTU). Mrs Nicholls is shown ‘tilting at windmills’, a phrase taken from the novel Don Quixote in which the titular character begins fighting windmills he imagines to be giants. The cartoon therefore shows Mrs Nicholls fighting what the cartoonist sees as the false enemies or ‘windmills’ of tobacco and alcohol. State Library of South Australia D 8309 (Misc) 12A

This image depicts Elizabeth Webb Nicholls, then President of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union of South Australia (WCTU). Mrs Nicholls is shown ‘tilting at windmills’, a phrase taken from the novel Don Quixote in which the titular character begins fighting windmills he imagines to be giants. The cartoon therefore shows Mrs Nicholls fighting what the cartoonist sees as the false enemies or ‘windmills’ of tobacco and alcohol. State Library of South Australia D 8309 (Misc) 12A

An article that mentions a feature in a magazine called Review of Reviews, in which there are photographs of suffragists prompting the author to state that they "may perhaps assist in removing a popular misconception as to the personal appearance of the "Women's Rights" advocate".  Brisbane Courier, 9 Feb 1895

An article that mentions a feature in a magazine called Review of Reviews, in which there are photographs of suffragists prompting the author to state that they "may perhaps assist in removing a popular misconception as to the personal appearance of the "Women's Rights" advocate". Brisbane Courier, 9 Feb 1895

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