ANZAC Cove | ANZAC Cove is a small cove on the Gallipoli peninsula in Turkey. It became famous as the site of World War I landing of the ANZAC (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) on 25 April 1915. The cove is a mere 600 metres (2,000 ft) long. Following the landing at Anzac Cove, the beach became the main base for the Australian and New Zealand troops for the eight months of the Battle of Gallipoli.

ANZAC Cove | ANZAC Cove is a small cove on the Gallipoli peninsula in Turkey. It became famous as the site of World War I landing of the ANZAC (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) on 25 April 1915. The cove is a mere 600 metres (2,000 ft) long. Following the landing at Anzac Cove, the beach became the main base for the Australian and New Zealand troops for the eight months of the Battle of Gallipoli.

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Australian Aboriginal serviceman, 50246 Trooper William (Willie) Allen, 11th Light Horse Regiment - circa 1917.Originally from Darwin, Tpr Allen enlisted on 10 December 1917, and returned to Australia on 20 July 1919.

Australian Aboriginal serviceman, 50246 Trooper William (Willie) Allen, 11th Light Horse Regiment - circa 1917.Originally from Darwin, Tpr Allen enlisted on 10 December 1917, and returned to Australia on 20 July 1919.

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Anzac Day ~ The Ode.

Anzac Day ~ The Ode.

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Photograph of ANZAC soldier and British soldier with Turkish woman, her children and donkey. The soldiers are giving them a drink of water. From a collection of official photographs of the Dardanelles Expedition, 1915.

Photograph of ANZAC soldier and British soldier with Turkish woman, her children and donkey. The soldiers are giving them a drink of water. From a collection of official photographs of the Dardanelles Expedition, 1915.

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Trp SJ Arbuthnot 8ALH. Australian Light Horsemen. WW1 The Charge at Beersheba. Proud of our Sth Aussies. Like this soldier my grandfather was there. He was just behind them coming up the rear. His diary tells us of the devastation and suffering. They were tough.

Trp SJ Arbuthnot 8ALH. Australian Light Horsemen. WW1 The Charge at Beersheba. Proud of our Sth Aussies. Like this soldier my grandfather was there. He was just behind them coming up the rear. His diary tells us of the devastation and suffering. They were tough.

John "Jack" Simpson Kirkpatrick (6 July 1892 – 19 May 1915), who served under the name John Simpson, was a stretcher bearer with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Gallipoli Campaign in World War I. After landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, he obtained a donkey and began carrying wounded British Empire soldiers from the frontline to the beach, for evacuation.

John "Jack" Simpson Kirkpatrick (6 July 1892 – 19 May 1915), who served under the name John Simpson, was a stretcher bearer with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Gallipoli Campaign in World War I. After landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, he obtained a donkey and began carrying wounded British Empire soldiers from the frontline to the beach, for evacuation.

John "Jack" Simpson Kirkpatrick (centre of picture) who served under the name John Simpson, was a stretcher bearer with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Gallipoli Campaign. After landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, he obtained a donkey and began carrying wounded soldiers from the frontline to the beach, for evacuation. He did this for three and a half weeks, often under fire, until he was killed. Simpson and his Donkey are a key part of the "Anzac legend".

John "Jack" Simpson Kirkpatrick (centre of picture) who served under the name John Simpson, was a stretcher bearer with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Gallipoli Campaign. After landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, he obtained a donkey and began carrying wounded soldiers from the frontline to the beach, for evacuation. He did this for three and a half weeks, often under fire, until he was killed. Simpson and his Donkey are a key part of the "Anzac legend".

Members of the 1st Royal Australian Navy Bridging Train who had previous service with the Australian Naval & Military Expeditionary Force to New Guinea in 1914.

Members of the 1st Royal Australian Navy Bridging Train who had previous service with the Australian Naval & Military Expeditionary Force to New Guinea in 1914.

Photograph of the landing on Gallipoli beach by ANZAC troops, Turkey, 1915. Presumably showing members of the 9th battalion and is mounted in a surround on which members of the battalion have signed their names. John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland image number TR1810-1v000r001 [hdl.handle.net/10462/deriv/252356]

Photograph of the landing on Gallipoli beach by ANZAC troops, Turkey, 1915. Presumably showing members of the 9th battalion and is mounted in a surround on which members of the battalion have signed their names. John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland image number TR1810-1v000r001 [hdl.handle.net/10462/deriv/252356]

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