CCP: ATSI histories and cultures

Resources to support the cross curricular priority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures.
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A You Tube video of the dreamtime story  "How the Kangaroo Got Her Pouch" + an Aboriginal art activity

A You Tube video of the dreamtime story "How the Kangaroo Got Her Pouch" + an Aboriginal art activity

An interactive online educational resource, aligned to the Australian Curriculum: Science representing Aboriginal seasonal knowledge

An interactive online educational resource, aligned to the Australian Curriculum: Science representing Aboriginal seasonal knowledge

TomTom-  Tom Tom provides a rich source of literature-based learning for children. For non-Indigenous students, it provides the opportunity to see the great commonalities that exist between Indigenous children and themselves, and also develop an understanding of the differences which exist in the ways people live.    For Indigenous children, it provides the opportunity to see their own life brought to the page; a chance to see themselves in literature

TomTom- Tom Tom provides a rich source of literature-based learning for children. For non-Indigenous students, it provides the opportunity to see the great commonalities that exist between Indigenous children and themselves, and also develop an understanding of the differences which exist in the ways people live. For Indigenous children, it provides the opportunity to see their own life brought to the page; a chance to see themselves in literature

Fair Skin Black Fella - This is the story of Mary, a young Aboriginal girl who lives on a red and dusty cattle station. Shunned by the other girls because of her fair skin, Old Ned, one of the community elders, finally speaks up. With words full of knowledge and wisdom, he teaches the girls that Aboriginal identity transcends skin colour and that family, community, country, culture and spirituality is what being Aboriginal is really about.

Fair Skin Black Fella - This is the story of Mary, a young Aboriginal girl who lives on a red and dusty cattle station. Shunned by the other girls because of her fair skin, Old Ned, one of the community elders, finally speaks up. With words full of knowledge and wisdom, he teaches the girls that Aboriginal identity transcends skin colour and that family, community, country, culture and spirituality is what being Aboriginal is really about.

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