(17) NOTES: (A) There is nothing wrong with flour for dusting but I prefer semolina, as you tend to use less and on the tray it acts like little ball bearings. The dusting of semolina on the loaf gives a slight extra crunch in the mouth.  (B) Bran has more minerals than flour, so you need less salt in the bread. If you aren't adding bran, increase salt to 2tsp. (Chris S)

(17) NOTES: (A) There is nothing wrong with flour for dusting but I prefer semolina, as you tend to use less and on the tray it acts like little ball bearings. The dusting of semolina on the loaf gives a slight extra crunch in the mouth. (B) Bran has more minerals than flour, so you need less salt in the bread. If you aren't adding bran, increase salt to 2tsp. (Chris S)

(1) If you have a breadmaker but want a handmade loaf, use it for kneading and the first rise and do the rest by hand.(Chris S.)

(1) If you have a breadmaker but want a handmade loaf, use it for kneading and the first rise and do the rest by hand.(Chris S.)

(12) If you want to, carefully score the top with a scalpel or razor blade to a depth of about 1cm. In theory, this enables the bread to rise (or spring) more in the oven. You will still get a very nice loaf if you don't score, and if you are a little rough, or the dough is overproofed (left too long and so weakening), it may deflate. (Chris S)

(12) If you want to, carefully score the top with a scalpel or razor blade to a depth of about 1cm. In theory, this enables the bread to rise (or spring) more in the oven. You will still get a very nice loaf if you don't score, and if you are a little rough, or the dough is overproofed (left too long and so weakening), it may deflate. (Chris S)

(10) cover the dough lightly with a piece of clingfilm. It doesn't have to be an airtight seal. If it's light enough and there is enough flour/semolina on the dough, you won't have trouble getting the clingfilm off at the end. (Chris S)

(10) cover the dough lightly with a piece of clingfilm. It doesn't have to be an airtight seal. If it's light enough and there is enough flour/semolina on the dough, you won't have trouble getting the clingfilm off at the end. (Chris S)

(8) Grease a tray and dust it lightly with flour or semolina. Shape the dough lightly and place on the tray. Leave room around each piece of dough as they will grow a lot. This tray is 29cm x 39cm (Chris S)

(8) Grease a tray and dust it lightly with flour or semolina. Shape the dough lightly and place on the tray. Leave room around each piece of dough as they will grow a lot. This tray is 29cm x 39cm (Chris S)

(3) Add 500ml warm water. If you are not adding the bran, drop the water to 480-490ml, as the bran takes up some of the water. Ratio of flour to water is critical, different flours need different amounts of water for best results, and plus or minus 10-20ml will make a big difference. 500ml seems ideal for Wallaby unbleached white flour (Chris S)

(3) Add 500ml warm water. If you are not adding the bran, drop the water to 480-490ml, as the bran takes up some of the water. Ratio of flour to water is critical, different flours need different amounts of water for best results, and plus or minus 10-20ml will make a big difference. 500ml seems ideal for Wallaby unbleached white flour (Chris S)

(16) Enjoy. Freezing is quite OK. This loaf was one done earlier (ones in the first picture) and frozen. It still tasted delicious.  If you want to try wholemeal, spelt or rye, be aware these won't rise as much as white. Spelt comes close, wholemeal maybe 3/4 as much, and rye needs to be mixed with white or spelt. I tend to mix all these 50:50 with white and I still add extra fibre to all of them. Good Luck. (Chris S)

(16) Enjoy. Freezing is quite OK. This loaf was one done earlier (ones in the first picture) and frozen. It still tasted delicious. If you want to try wholemeal, spelt or rye, be aware these won't rise as much as white. Spelt comes close, wholemeal maybe 3/4 as much, and rye needs to be mixed with white or spelt. I tend to mix all these 50:50 with white and I still add extra fibre to all of them. Good Luck. (Chris S)

(15) Place loaves on to a wire rack to cool and enjoy the sound of the crust cracking. The crust will be quite hard at this stage, but as the loaf cools, moisture will travel from the inside to the crust and soften it a little. Try to let it cool before eating, as the bread is still changing as it cools. Just warm is probably OK. (Chris S)

(15) Place loaves on to a wire rack to cool and enjoy the sound of the crust cracking. The crust will be quite hard at this stage, but as the loaf cools, moisture will travel from the inside to the crust and soften it a little. Try to let it cool before eating, as the bread is still changing as it cools. Just warm is probably OK. (Chris S)

(14)  When the time is up, take out of the oven. Tapping the base should give a hollow sound and the loaves should feel light. If they don't brown, or it appears they haven't cooked properly, you need to check the temperature settings on your oven. (Chris S)

(14) When the time is up, take out of the oven. Tapping the base should give a hollow sound and the loaves should feel light. If they don't brown, or it appears they haven't cooked properly, you need to check the temperature settings on your oven. (Chris S)

(13) Place in the oven. You need approx. 15min @ 240deg C. If your oven is fan forced, turn the tray around at the 10-15min mark so it also browns the cool side. This is the browning phase, so keep an eye on it. After about 10 mins you will notice the loaves have really 'puffed up' or 'sprung'. They will drop a little through the baking, don't worry.  After the 15min @ 240deg C, turn the oven down to 200-210deg C and leave for another 30 mins for large loaves. Small rolls, try 20 mins (Chris…

(13) Place in the oven. You need approx. 15min @ 240deg C. If your oven is fan forced, turn the tray around at the 10-15min mark so it also browns the cool side. This is the browning phase, so keep an eye on it. After about 10 mins you will notice the loaves have really 'puffed up' or 'sprung'. They will drop a little through the baking, don't worry. After the 15min @ 240deg C, turn the oven down to 200-210deg C and leave for another 30 mins for large loaves. Small rolls, try 20 mins (Chris…


More ideas
(2) Weigh out 675g bread flour, 1.5 tsp salt, 2 tsp dried yeast. I add extra fibre to all my loaves, so I add 1/4 cup oat or barley bran and 1/4 cup wheat bran. Optional are 2 tsp bread improver, 2 tsp milk powder and 2 Tblsp E.V. olive oil. (Chris S)

(2) Weigh out 675g bread flour, 1.5 tsp salt, 2 tsp dried yeast. I add extra fibre to all my loaves, so I add 1/4 cup oat or barley bran and 1/4 cup wheat bran. Optional are 2 tsp bread improver, 2 tsp milk powder and 2 Tblsp E.V. olive oil. (Chris S)

(3) Add 500ml warm water. If you are not adding the bran, drop the water to 480-490ml, as the bran takes up some of the water. Ratio of flour to water is critical, different flours need different amounts of water for best results, and plus or minus 10-20ml will make a big difference. 500ml seems ideal for Wallaby unbleached white flour (Chris S)

(3) Add 500ml warm water. If you are not adding the bran, drop the water to 480-490ml, as the bran takes up some of the water. Ratio of flour to water is critical, different flours need different amounts of water for best results, and plus or minus 10-20ml will make a big difference. 500ml seems ideal for Wallaby unbleached white flour (Chris S)

(8) Grease a tray and dust it lightly with flour or semolina. Shape the dough lightly and place on the tray. Leave room around each piece of dough as they will grow a lot. This tray is 29cm x 39cm (Chris S)

(8) Grease a tray and dust it lightly with flour or semolina. Shape the dough lightly and place on the tray. Leave room around each piece of dough as they will grow a lot. This tray is 29cm x 39cm (Chris S)

(7) Depending on what you want to end up with, cut the ball of dough to size. Here I want two Boules or Cobs. (Chris S)

(7) Depending on what you want to end up with, cut the ball of dough to size. Here I want two Boules or Cobs. (Chris S)

(4) Put the machine on it's dough setting. This will mix the dough and keep it warm while you leave it for the first rise. (Chris S)

(4) Put the machine on it's dough setting. This will mix the dough and keep it warm while you leave it for the first rise. (Chris S)

(5) When it's finished mixing, dough should be uniform, elastic and moist enough to settle a bit in the bottom of the pan. Leave the lid down and let it rise until roughly doubled in volume. Check after 20 mins to guage how quickly it is rising. (Chris S)

(5) When it's finished mixing, dough should be uniform, elastic and moist enough to settle a bit in the bottom of the pan. Leave the lid down and let it rise until roughly doubled in volume. Check after 20 mins to guage how quickly it is rising. (Chris S)

Country Loaf Bread-with steel cut oats, apples, & molasses

A Country Loaf: Steel Cut Oats, Apple, & Molasses

Better Than Texas Roadhouse Rolls ~ Fluffy, buttery, tender dinner rolls...I have a hard time believing this, but worth a try!

Better Than Texas Roadhouse Rolls

Better Than Texas Roadhouse Rolls ~ Fluffy, buttery, tender dinner rolls...I have a hard time believing this, but worth a try!

These are the best hot cross buns I've tasted. Soft and sweet these buns are perfect for breakfast on Easter morning or Good Friday.

Easy Easter Hot Cross Buns

These are the best hot cross buns I've tasted. Soft and sweet these buns are perfect for breakfast on Easter morning or Good Friday.

Pinterest
Search