WW1 Gallipoli 1915 April - 1916 January Anzac Cove Helles Suvla Bay

ASC ( Army Service Corps ) Depots Stores Supplies, Zion &or Indian Mule Transport Corps, 4th AASC Coy, North Beach, South Beach, Brighton Beach, Hell Spit, Gaba Tebe,
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It's the centenary of the outbreak of World War 1 and various commemorative events will be held across Australia to remember our service men and women.

It's the centenary of the outbreak of World War 1 and various commemorative events will be held across Australia to remember our service men and women.

An elevated view of the beach, crowded with Australian and New Zealand troops the day after the landing at Anzac Cove, Gallipoli. Ships can be seen in the background 26 April 1915. Australian War Memorial A03868.

An elevated view of the beach, crowded with Australian and New Zealand troops the day after the landing at Anzac Cove, Gallipoli. Ships can be seen in the background 26 April 1915. Australian War Memorial A03868.

THE THIRD BATTLE OF YPRES (PASSCHENDAELE) 31 JULY - 10 NOVEMBER 1917

THE THIRD BATTLE OF YPRES (PASSCHENDAELE) 31 JULY - 10 NOVEMBER 1917

The Gallipoli peninsula is in modern-day Turkey, but in 1915 it was part of the Ottoman Empire. As Allied soldiers prepared to invade, they hoisted a mule hoisted aboard the collier ship SS River Clyde ahead of the three-day journey across the Aegean Sea

Never-before-seen photographs show horror of doomed Gallipoli landings through the eyes of the soldiers who fought there

The Gallipoli peninsula is in modern-day Turkey, but in 1915 it was part of the Ottoman Empire. As Allied soldiers prepared to invade, they hoisted a mule hoisted aboard the collier ship SS River Clyde ahead of the three-day journey across the Aegean Sea

The Gallipoli Campaign (Battle of Gallipoli) was one of the Allies great disasters in World War One. It was carried out between 25th April 1915 and 9th January 1916 on the Gallipoli peninsula in the Ottoman Empire. The doomed campaign was thought up by Winston Churchill to end the war early by creating a new war front that the Ottomans could not cope with.

The Gallipoli Campaign (Battle of Gallipoli) was one of the Allies great disasters in World War One. It was carried out between 25th April 1915 and 9th January 1916 on the Gallipoli peninsula in the Ottoman Empire. The doomed campaign was thought up by Winston Churchill to end the war early by creating a new war front that the Ottomans could not cope with.

The Gallipoli Campaign (Battle of Gallipoli) was one of the Allies great disasters in World War One. It was carried out between 25th April 1915 and 9th January 1916 on the Gallipoli peninsula in the Ottoman Empire. The doomed campaign was thought up by Winston Churchill to end the war early by creating a new war front that the Ottomans could not cope with.

The Gallipoli Campaign (Battle of Gallipoli) was one of the Allies great disasters in World War One. It was carried out between 25th April 1915 and 9th January 1916 on the Gallipoli peninsula in the Ottoman Empire. The doomed campaign was thought up by Winston Churchill to end the war early by creating a new war front that the Ottomans could not cope with.

Gallipoli, 1915, ASC Depot, North Beach showing "Sphinx", Australian War Memorial P00061.004

Gallipoli, 1915, ASC Depot, North Beach showing "Sphinx", Australian War Memorial P00061.004


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John "Jack" Simpson Kirkpatrick (centre of picture) who served under the name John Simpson, was a stretcher bearer with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Gallipoli Campaign. After landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, he obtained a donkey and began carrying wounded  soldiers from the frontline to the beach, for evacuation. He did this for three and a half weeks, often under fire, until he was killed. Simpson and his Donkey are a key part of the "Anzac legend".

John "Jack" Simpson Kirkpatrick (centre of picture) who served under the name John Simpson, was a stretcher bearer with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Gallipoli Campaign. After landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, he obtained a donkey and began carrying wounded soldiers from the frontline to the beach, for evacuation. He did this for three and a half weeks, often under fire, until he was killed. Simpson and his Donkey are a key part of the "Anzac legend".

WWI Aussies: (ANZAC) Australia and New Zealand Army Corp.

WWI Aussies: (ANZAC) Australia and New Zealand Army Corp.

Anzac Digger & Modern Digger. Anzac Day 25-4-2013.   http://www.news.com.au/national-news/australia-celebrates-and-remembers-on-anzac-day-2013/story-fncynjr2-1226629003721

Anzac Digger & Modern Digger. Anzac Day 25-4-2013. http://www.news.com.au/national-news/australia-celebrates-and-remembers-on-anzac-day-2013/story-fncynjr2-1226629003721

Australian soldiers in Gallipoli 1915. Sitting proudly in the middle is an Indigenous Australian.

Australian soldiers in Gallipoli 1915. Sitting proudly in the middle is an Indigenous Australian.

Miller Mack, one of 1st Indigenous Australians to serve in WWI Indigenous Australians not allowed to sign up  (they were not legally allowed to wear Australian military uniform until 1949, when they officially became citizens). Many managed to circumvent restrictions - claimed Maori or Indian ancestry in order to do so. As many as 1,000 served in the war. At least 11 Aboriginal men were killed at Gallipoli  21 survived the campaign.

Miller Mack, one of 1st Indigenous Australians to serve in WWI Indigenous Australians not allowed to sign up (they were not legally allowed to wear Australian military uniform until 1949, when they officially became citizens). Many managed to circumvent restrictions - claimed Maori or Indian ancestry in order to do so. As many as 1,000 served in the war. At least 11 Aboriginal men were killed at Gallipoli 21 survived the campaign.

John "Jack" Simpson Kirkpatrick (centre of picture) who served under the name John Simpson, was a stretcher bearer with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Gallipoli Campaign. After landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, he obtained a donkey and began carrying wounded soldiers from the frontline to the beach, for evacuation. He did this for three and a half weeks, often under fire, until he was killed. Simpson and his Donkey are a key part of the "Anzac legend".

John "Jack" Simpson Kirkpatrick (centre of picture) who served under the name John Simpson, was a stretcher bearer with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Gallipoli Campaign. After landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, he obtained a donkey and began carrying wounded soldiers from the frontline to the beach, for evacuation. He did this for three and a half weeks, often under fire, until he was killed. Simpson and his Donkey are a key part of the "Anzac legend".

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