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The Kelly Gang - L - R - Ned Kelly, Joe Byrne, Steve Hart and Dan Kelly (N. Kelly's brother)

The Kelly Gang - L - R - Ned Kelly, Joe Byrne, Steve Hart and Dan Kelly (N. Kelly's brother)

In this engraving based on a watercolour by Julian Ashton, during the Petty Sessions hearing in Beechworth, Ned Kelly supports his crippled left arm by gripping his lapel while resting a shot-mauled hand on the dock.

In this engraving based on a watercolour by Julian Ashton, during the Petty Sessions hearing in Beechworth, Ned Kelly supports his crippled left arm by gripping his lapel while resting a shot-mauled hand on the dock.

Only hours after he had administered the sacraments to a critically wounded Ned Kelly, Father Matthew Gibney, ran into the burning Glenrowan Inn and found the bodies of Joe Byrne, Dan Kelly and Steve Hart.

Only hours after he had administered the sacraments to a critically wounded Ned Kelly, Father Matthew Gibney, ran into the burning Glenrowan Inn and found the bodies of Joe Byrne, Dan Kelly and Steve Hart.

The wedding portrait of Constable Robert Graham and Mary Kirk symbolises the end of the Kelly rebellion. Graham gained the trust of Mrs Kelly and her family, to become a respected member of the community. The Grahams’ first child was born at Greta.

The wedding portrait of Constable Robert Graham and Mary Kirk symbolises the end of the Kelly rebellion. Graham gained the trust of Mrs Kelly and her family, to become a respected member of the community. The Grahams’ first child was born at Greta.

A hastily drawn study from the ‘Australasian Sketcher’ shows Ned Kelly leaning on the dock, as he did for his famous pre-sentence debate with Sir Redmond Barry the presiding judge who regarded Ned as an enemy of society and, in his eagerness to dispose of him, conducted a highly fallacious trial.

A hastily drawn study from the ‘Australasian Sketcher’ shows Ned Kelly leaning on the dock, as he did for his famous pre-sentence debate with Sir Redmond Barry the presiding judge who regarded Ned as an enemy of society and, in his eagerness to dispose of him, conducted a highly fallacious trial.

Old Melbourne Gaol. Between 1842 and its closure in 1929 the gaol was the scene of 133 hangings including Australia's most infamous citizen, the bushranger Ned Kelly.

Old Melbourne Gaol. Between 1842 and its closure in 1929 the gaol was the scene of 133 hangings including Australia's most infamous citizen, the bushranger Ned Kelly.