Great raised garden idea.

Could this work for deer-proof flowers? Raised garden bed- convertible to cold frame or woodchuck fencing

~~ Banksia ~~

AUSTRALIAN NATIVE: Banksia - These Australian wildflowers and popular garden plants are easily recognized by their characteristic flower spikes and fruiting "cones" and heads.

Northern California drought-tolerant garden ~ grasses, artemisia, succulents, Russian sage, & verbena bonariensis . . . . ღTrish W ~ http://www.pinterest.com/trishw/ . . . .

Planting: Drought Tolerant Garden

Russian sage, Verbena bonariensis, Mexican Feather grass, Miscanthus, purple and grey plant combination design by Giardino Segreto

chapter 23 landscape , this landscape is a stair with grass on it , what can get more creative then that ?!

Arquiteto: Emanuela RecchiFotógrafo: Guy HervaisFonte: Architectural Digest Juin 2011 -- okay maybe not as grand as this but I love the idea of using grass on the stairs

Recycled sleeper retaining wall and screen, matched with Australian natives. Phillip Johnson Landscapes. Parkdale, Victoria

Applying sleepers vertical and at different sizes dramatically improves the effect in a natural bush style garden. Well positioned large rocks adds the next level of charm. Critic by John Dodd.

This dramatic garden has been designed with limited rainfall in mind. Huge clumps of Agave americana, with its distinctive pointy leaves, combine well with the lime-green heads of Euphorbia and the bold pink flower spires of sprawling Echium, while Gazanias provide a pretty border in the foreground. The emphasis on form and texture provides an excellent contrast to the clean lines of the contemporary architecture.

Low rainfall garden / Agave americana with its distinctive pointy leaves / the lime-green heads of Euphorbia / bold pink flower spires of sprawling Echium / Gazanias in foreground

The Hairpin Banksia (Banksia spinulosa) is a species of woody shrub, of the genus Banksia in the Proteaceae family, native to eastern Australia. Widely distributed, it is found as an understorey plant in open dry forest or heathland from Victoria to northern Queensland, generally on sandstone though sometimes also clay soils. It generally grows as a small shrub to 2 metres (7 ft) in height, though can be a straggly tree to 6 metres (20 ft).

The Hairpin Banksia (Banksia spinulosa) is a species of woody shrub, of the genus Banksia in the Proteaceae family, native to eastern Australia.


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