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he Acorn BBC model A was the successor of the Acorn Atom and its first name was Acorn Proton. It was a very popular computer in the UK and was widely used in schools,

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Acorn Computer ATOM The Acorn Atom was the ancestor of the BBC computers series. It was sold in kit or ready-assembled versions. The great advantage of the Atom compared to its competitors (TRS-80 & PET), was its high resolution capabilities (256 x 192) which were quite unusual in 1979 for the price.

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Super RARE Vintage Acorn Trackerball Acorn Computers

Acorn computer http://flashbackgames.co.uk/shop/Item.asp?Title=Acorn_Electron_Computer_Unboxed=1181

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Blast from the past! The Acorn Electron was a budget version of the BBC Micro educational/home computer made by Acorn Computers Ltd. It had 32 kilobytes of RAM, and its ROM includes BBC BASIC along with its operating system.

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The Acorn ABC 210 / Cambridge Workstation was the only model from the announced, marketed but unreleased ABC (Acorn Business Computer) line, first claimed to be available in October 1984. The ABCs were a range of machines using an integrated monitor, disk drive, PSU and BBC B+ 64K motherboard with slight modifications, originally featuring CPUs from straight 6502 terminals to an 80286 based system.

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Acorn System 1. This 6502 modular system was the first computer produced by Acorn in 1979. It was basically the same type of computer as competitors offered at that time (KIM-1, MK14, Nascom, etc...) : a 6502 or Z80 CPU (in this case, a 6502) mounted on a simple "naked" board, with a one-line display and a hexadecimal keyboard.

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from BBC News

The BBC Microcomputer and me, 30 years down the line

BBC Micro (1982) built by Acorn Computers as part of the BBC's Computer Literacy Project.

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from BBC News

Tech Talent: How the UK lost six potential titans

Until very recently, ARM Holdings was the flag-waver for the UK's tech scene. The computer chip designer was created in Cambridge in 1990 as a joint venture between Acorn Computers and Apple. The US firm wanted a processor to power its first hand-held device, the Newton MessagePad, but later sold its stake after Steve Jobs returned and ditched the product. That didn't end the relationship between the two companies though, as ARM's designs were used in processors that powered first the iPod

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