This is the African Pangolin (still alive today). Its front claws are too big to walk on and are used primarily for digging for insects. It looks like a dinosaur!!

This is the African Pangolin (still alive today). Its front claws are too big to walk on and are used primarily for digging for insects. It looks like a dinosaur!!

Shared by boebanie. This is the African Pangolin (still alive today). Its front claws are too big to walk on and are used primarily for digging for insects. It looks like a dinosaur!

Shy Pangolin | ©Gary Parker  Common names: Cape pangolin, Scaly anteater, South African pangolin, Temminck’s ground pangolin, Pangolin De Te...

Shy Pangolin | ©Gary Parker Common names: Cape pangolin, Scaly anteater, South African pangolin, Temminck’s ground pangolin, Pangolin De Te...

Raymond Jansen - is Chairman of the APWG. He is an Professor in the Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences in the Faculty of Science at the Tshwane University of Technology. He holds a PhD in Zoology from the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology based at the University of Cape Town.He supervises post-graduate students working on African pangolin ecology, their use in traditional medicine and their prevalence in the bushmeat markets of West and southern Africa.

Raymond Jansen - is Chairman of the APWG. He is an Professor in the Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences in the Faculty of Science at the Tshwane University of Technology. He holds a PhD in Zoology from the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology based at the University of Cape Town.He supervises post-graduate students working on African pangolin ecology, their use in traditional medicine and their prevalence in the bushmeat markets of West and southern Africa.

Pangolins are native to 15 African countries and live in dense forests and forested savanna areas. When sensing danger they will roll themselves up into balls using its armor-plated scales for protection. These scales are also very sharp and will cut through anything inserted in between them. An increasingly vulnerable mammal that is hunted primarily by humans it receives protected status as its numbers in the wild continue to decline. Learn more about this threatened animal!

Pangolin

Pangolins are native to 15 African countries and live in dense forests and forested savanna areas. When sensing danger they will roll themselves up into balls using its armor-plated scales for protection. These scales are also very sharp and will cut through anything inserted in between them. An increasingly vulnerable mammal that is hunted primarily by humans it receives protected status as its numbers in the wild continue to decline. Learn more about this threatened animal!

Baby Pangolin | 22 Of The Cutest Animal Babies You've Never Seen Before

22 Of The Cutest Animal Babies You've Never Seen Before

Baby Pangolin | 22 Of The Cutest Animal Babies You've Never Seen Before

This is the African Pangolin (still alive today). Its front claws are too big to walk on and are used primarily for digging for insects. It looks like a dinosaur!! by amie

This is the African Pangolin (still alive today). Its front claws are too big to walk on and are used primarily for digging for insects. It looks like a dinosaur!! by amie

Family Manidae (Pangolins) - Plate 150, Volume 2 of the Handbook of the Mammals of the World

Family Manidae (Pangolins) - Plate 150, Volume 2 of the Handbook of the Mammals of the World

The forensic application of DNA barcoding for identification of illegally  traded African pangolin scales - Genome  This recent article published in the Journal Genome and co-authored by three board members of the APWG highlights the importance of forensic DNA methodologies in combating the pangolin trade..

The forensic application of DNA barcoding for identification of illegally traded African pangolin scales - Genome This recent article published in the Journal Genome and co-authored by three board members of the APWG highlights the importance of forensic DNA methodologies in combating the pangolin trade..

How the Pangolin Got Its Scales – A Genetic Just-So Story | DNA Science Blog  So how did the pangolin get its scales? Genetic research tells us how in a scientific paper co-authored by Professor Antoinette Kotze of the African Pangolin Working Group.

How the Pangolin Got Its Scales – A Genetic Just-So Story

How the Pangolin Got Its Scales – A Genetic Just-So Story | DNA Science Blog So how did the pangolin get its scales? Genetic research tells us how in a scientific paper co-authored by Professor Antoinette Kotze of the African Pangolin Working Group.

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