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10 Big Cats That Have Gone Extinct in Modern Times

The now extinct 'American Lion' was a giant predator roaming North and South America as recently as 11,000 years ago. It is thought to have been about twenty-five percent larger than the modern African lion. "American lions likely preyed on deer, North American horses (now extinct), North American camels, North American tapirs, American bison, mammoths, and other large, herbivorous animals."

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The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) — also known as the North American lion, Naegele’s giant jaguar or American cave lion — is an extinct lion of the family Felidae, endemic to North America and northwestern South America during the Pleistocene epoch (0.34 mya to 11,000 years ago), existing for approximately 0.33 million years.[1] It has been shown by genetic analysis to be a sister lineage to the Eurasian cave lion (Panthera leo spelaea or P. spelaea).[2]@Wikipedia.org

Kennis & Kennis - It's the American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) – also known as the North American lion, Naegele’s giant jaguar or American cave lion. see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wik...

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Ten Strange Animal Hybrids

liger é o conjunto de um leao e de um tigre "liger"é verdadeiro acreditem em mim! ;-* ;)

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Some researchers say that mystery black panthers in America represent a surviving hidden population of a prehistoric cat, Panthera atrox, an animal that is also used to explain sightings of American Lions.

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Lake Martin Louisiana Swamp - I know this is a Crocodile or Alligator, but they both live in this part of the world! I just don't know which one this is? ...~~I feel very confident that this is an Alligator :)

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Fig. 1-12. Drawings of extinct Pleistocene large predators. "The Carnivore guild of Rancho La Brea. From left to right.  The dire wolf (Canis dirus), the sabre-toothed cat (Smilodon fatalis), the short-faced bear (Arctodus simus), the cheetah-like cat (Miracinonyx sp.), and the American lion (Panthera leo atrox). (modified from Turner and Anton, 1997)."