The Online Medieval and Classical Library (OMACL) is a collection of some of the most important literary works of Classical and Medieval civilization.

The Online Medieval and Classical Library (OMACL) is a collection of some of the most important literary works of Classical and Medieval civilization.

I love the King Arthur legend.  I read the Le Morte D'Arthur in high school and Mists of Avalon.  Plus the Mary Stewart Merlin series.

I love the King Arthur legend. I read the Le Morte D'Arthur in high school and Mists of Avalon. Plus the Mary Stewart Merlin series.

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle  The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle began to be compiled in around 890 A.D., at the command of King Alfred the Great (871- 899) and consists of a series of annals written in the Old English language.

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle began to be compiled in around 890 A.D., at the command of King Alfred the Great (871- 899) and consists of a series of annals written in the Old English language.

The Peterbrough Chronicle. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles refer to a collection of old writings and manuscripts kept by monasteries across England. They are written in blackletter and tell the history of the Anglo-Saxons. The recording started in the 9th century during the reign of Alfred the Great and stopped at different times in different regions. The Peterborough chronicle was still being updated as late as 1154.

The Peterbrough Chronicle. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles refer to a collection of old writings and manuscripts kept by monasteries across England. They are written in blackletter and tell the history of the Anglo-Saxons. The recording started in the 9th century during the reign of Alfred the Great and stopped at different times in different regions. The Peterborough chronicle was still being updated as late as 1154.

Most of the information we have about the Anglo-Saxons comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, a year-by-year account of all the major events of the time. Description from gaukartifact.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Most of the information we have about the Anglo-Saxons comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, a year-by-year account of all the major events of the time. Description from gaukartifact.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

The Danelaw, as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (also known as the Danelagh; Old English: Dena lagu; Danish: Danelagen), is a historical name given to the part of England in which the laws of the "Danes" held sway[1] and dominated those of the Anglo-Saxons. It is contrasted with "West Saxon law" and "Mercian law". The term has been extended by modern historians to be geographical. The areas that comprised the Danelaw are in northern and eastern England.

The Danelaw, as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (also known as the Danelagh; Old English: Dena lagu; Danish: Danelagen), is a historical name given to the part of England in which the laws of the "Danes" held sway[1] and dominated those of the Anglo-Saxons. It is contrasted with "West Saxon law" and "Mercian law". The term has been extended by modern historians to be geographical. The areas that comprised the Danelaw are in northern and eastern England.

The Bayeux Tapestry - chronicles the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England. It is actually and embroidered cloth and is nearly 230 feet long. The fact that it survived in such amazing shape since it's creation (no one knows exactly when but it is mentioned in the 1400's) is incredible... Been there!

The Bayeux Tapestry - chronicles the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England. It is actually and embroidered cloth and is nearly 230 feet long. The fact that it survived in such amazing shape since it's creation (no one knows exactly when but it is mentioned in the 1400's) is incredible... Been there!

"Cornweallas" shown on an early 19th-century map of "Saxon England" (and Wales) based on the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.

"Cornweallas" shown on an early 19th-century map of "Saxon England" (and Wales) based on the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.

Caught up on your Old English? 9th-12th Century Anglo-Saxon Chronicles Now Online http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/digitisedmanuscripts/2016/02/anglo-saxon-chronicles-now-online.html

Caught up on your Old English? 9th-12th Century Anglo-Saxon Chronicles Now Online http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/digitisedmanuscripts/2016/02/anglo-saxon-chronicles-now-online.html

A page from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. These annals provide much of the official history of Britain as we know it. Copies of the original were distributed throughout the monasteries in England as official records, and were then individually updated by the monks. Hugely important source for the years between the end of Roman administration and the Norman Invasion.

A page from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. These annals provide much of the official history of Britain as we know it. Copies of the original were distributed throughout the monasteries in England as official records, and were then individually updated by the monks. Hugely important source for the years between the end of Roman administration and the Norman Invasion.

BBC Bitesize - KS2 History - What was the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle?

BBC Bitesize - KS2 History - What was the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle?

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