Anglo saxon words

immigrants from Denmark, Netherlands, and Germany spoke a cluster of related dialects falling within the Germanic branch of the Indo-European language family. Their language began to develop its own distinctive features in isolation from the continental Germanic languages, and by 600 A.D. had developed into what we call Old English or Anglo-Saxon, covering the territory of most of modern England.

History Books

Britain peoples circa 600 - Angles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain was a consequence of the migration of Germanic peoples from continental Germania during the Early Middle Ages, after the demise of Roman rule in the 5th century. These peoples are traditionally divided into Angles, Saxons and Jutes, but research conducted in the early 20th century suggests that a wide range of Germanic peoples from the North Sea coasts of Frisia, Lower Saxony, and Jutland may have moved to Britain in this era.

25 maps that explain the English language

The Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain was a consequence of the migration of Germanic peoples from continental Germania during the Early Middle Ages, after the demise of Roman rule in the century.

Anglo-Saxon runes (Futhorc) were used to write Old English / Anglo-Saxon and Old Frisian from about the 5th century AD. They were used in England until the 10th or 11th centuries, though after the 9th century they were mainly used in manuscripts and were of interest to antiquarians, and their use ceased after the Norman conquest in 1066.

Anglo-Saxon runes (Futhorc) From the century the Latin alphabet began to replace these runes, though some runes continued to appear in Latin texts representing whole words, and the Latin alphabet was extended with the runic letters þorn and wynn.

1. Anglo Saxon table showing Old English months with modern translations. There is some disagreement about the meanings of the Anglo-Saxon month-names. Gēola is the same word as ‘Yule’, and may also have something to do with the ‘wheel’ of the year. Sol is something of a puzzle. Easter is linked with the word ‘east’, where the sun rises on the spring equinox. Hrēð and hlȳda may be gods or goddesses.

the Anglo-Saxon months- Again, in regards to maintaining your character, learn the verbage! January is not January for the Anglo-Saxon. Be sure to use appropriate terms and language for the period you are portraying.

Left: Anglo-Saxon nobleman is wearing an embroidered tunic/ bliaud over a chemise with embroidered sherte (the word shirt comes from it), a chemise type garment with sleeves, mantle, cross-gartered breeches.  Right: noblewoman wears embroidered bliaud over chemise with cuffs. she wears mantle and headrail. fitted waist by lacings down the back.  (11th C)

This showcases a nobleman wearing an embroidered tunic/ a chemise type garment with sleeves, mantle,and breeches. This also shows a noblewoman wearing an embroidered bliaud, a chemise with cuffs, and she also has a mantle as her headdress.

Old English (Anglo Saxon) Grammar Book - Awesome help for explaining how the language worked. Yet another I'll add to my list for research on The Confessor's Burden.  #marymcfarlandauthor  MaryMcFarland  www.marymcfarlandauthor.com.

Old English (Anglo Saxon) Grammar Book - Awesome help for explaining how the language worked.

Æthelflæd - warrior queen of Mercia. She presided over the victory of The Battle of Tettenhall in AD 910, sometimes referred to as The Battle of Wōdnesfeld - now known as Wednesfield. Both of these areas are within the city of Wolverhampton, itself an ancient settlement formulated from the Anglo Saxon words 'Wulfruna' and 'Heantun'.

Aethelflaed, Lady of the Mercians, daughter of Alfred the Great, won battles with the Danes and even invaded Wales. My great grand aunt!

Anglo Saxon Boar Tooth Pendant. The boar was an important symbol to the Anglo-Saxon warrior class, who used its image on their helmets (Benty Grange, Wollaston) and other war-gear; the Old English word eofor ‘boar’ was used figuratively for ‘persistent and determined lone warrior’.

Anglo-Saxon pendant made from boar tusk encased in copper-alloy strip, pierced and riveted

Pinterest
Search