Understanding Aphasia in Stroke Survivors.... Seeing this makes me wish I was working in a hospital

Understanding Aphasia in Stroke Survivors.... Seeing this makes me wish I was working in a hospital

-*+There are two general categories of therapies, and most clinicians utilize both: Impairment-based therapies are aimed at improving language functions and consist of procedures in which the clinician directly stimulates specific listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Communication-based (also called consequence-based) therapies are intended to enhance communication by any means and encourage support from caregivers. …

-*+There are two general categories of therapies, and most clinicians utilize both: Impairment-based therapies are aimed at improving language functions and consist of procedures in which the clinician directly stimulates specific listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Communication-based (also called consequence-based) therapies are intended to enhance communication by any means and encourage support from caregivers. …

Free! Naming activity is designed for patients with anomic aphasia, difficulty with recall of words. This activity is appropriate for patient’s who have had a stroke, traumatic brain injury or even  pediatric population for vocabulary building

Free! Naming activity is designed for patients with anomic aphasia, difficulty with recall of words. This activity is appropriate for patient’s who have had a stroke, traumatic brain injury or even pediatric population for vocabulary building

Phonomotor Treatment: The Key to Reconnecting Sounds in Anomic Aphasia | MedBridge Blog

Phonomotor Treatment: The Key to Reconnecting Sounds in Anomic Aphasia | MedBridge Blog

This activity is designed for patients with anomic aphasia, difficulty with recall of words. This activity is appropriate for patient’s who have had a stroke, traumatic brain injury or even our pediatric population for vocabulary building.  This specific activity requires for the patient to name pictures of functional items that they will see in their everyday environment. A hierarchy of cues is provided for each naming

This activity is designed for patients with anomic aphasia, difficulty with recall of words. This activity is appropriate for patient’s who have had a stroke, traumatic brain injury or even our pediatric population for vocabulary building. This specific activity requires for the patient to name pictures of functional items that they will see in their everyday environment. A hierarchy of cues is provided for each naming

Pinterest
Search