Archaeological finds

Mesolithic female shaman of Bad Dürrenberg, 7000-6500 BCE, with reconstructed regalia.

Mesolithic Female Shaman of Bad Dürrenberg -- BCE -- Reconstructed regalia from animal bones, horns, teeth & shells -- Source: PDF of "Archaeological Finds From Germany.

Caiaphas Ossuary In 1990 a startling discovery was made that shook biblical scholars and archaeologists alike. In the Peace Forest section of Jerusalem was discovered a burial cave containing twelve ossuaries, one of them being none other than that of Caiaphas, the high priest who presided at the trial of Jesus. This amazing discovery provides us with a powerful historical connection to the events described in the Gospels.

The Caiaphas Ossuary - Caiaphas, the Jewish High Priest, played a prominent role in Jesus’ crucifixion. It was Caiaphas who sacrificed Christ in the interests of “expediency.

The Meesha Stele (846 BC) Popularly known as the Moabite Stone, it records the revolt of Meesha, King of Moab, against Israel. This incredible stele mentions Omri, King of Israel, and David of the United Monarchy. It even refers to Yahweh, the unique name of the God of Israel! Together with the testimony from the Tel Dan Stele, we have a powerful external witness that the Bible records the true history of the kings of Israel and their interactions with foreign kings.

Archaeologists once boasted that the Bible was full of errors because no independent, historic evidence had been found to confirm the Bible’s claims. But a slew of astounding discoveries has put a damper on their boasting.

Important archaeological finds of our time. Pompeii, the ancient Roman city, buried during a volcanic eruption in 79 AD when Mount Vesuvius exploded. It was lost for nearly 1700 years...

Important archaeological finds of our time. Pompeii, the ancient Roman city, buried during a volcanic eruption in 79 AD when Mount Vesuvius exploded. It was lost for nearly 1700 years.

Frightening Archaeological Finds: 15 Odd Human Remains

The skull of the "Vampire of Venice" was found in a mass plague grave with a brick stuck in its jaw in Forensic archaeologist, Matteo Borrini, used every bit of science at his disposal to investigate this skull and the person it may have been.

Dr Ed Oakley finds something small but interesting in a test pit in Southwell.

Our multi-period and interdisciplinary fieldwork project is investigating the historic minster town of Southwell, Nottinghamshire in its wider landscape setting.

The Holy Land: 7 Amazing Archaeological Finds

The Holy Land: 7 Amazing Archaeological Finds

From a massive structure beneath the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea Scrolls to a palace that may have been used by King David, archaeological discoveries abound in the Holy Land, a place of great religious importance.

The Fibula Dorestad: One of the most famous archaeological finds from the Netherlands, was found in 1969 in a well in Dorestad (Wijk bij Duurstede). The brooch is made of gold and inlaid with different colors of glass, almandine (red gemstone) and pearls along the edge. The style is that of ecclesiastical silverware Burgundian workshops from the time of Charlemagne. 800 AD

The Fibula Dorestad - c. 800 - found in 1969 in a well in Dorestad Netherlands -gold inlaid with almandine garnet, colored glass, and pearls - The style is that of ecclesiastical silverware Burgundian workshops from the time of Charlemagne.

6. Archaeological Finds Archaeologists once boasted that the Bible was full of errors because no independent, historic evidence had been found to confirm the Bible’s claims. But a slew of astounding discoveries has put a damper on their boasting.

Archaeological Finds Archaeologists once boasted that the Bible was full of errors because no independent, historic evidence had been found to confirm the Bible’s claims. But a slew of astounding discoveries has put a damper on their boasting.

Some of the Lewis Chessmen may not have been chessmen at all according to new research. The 12th and 13th century gaming pieces which were discovered in Uig on the Isle of Lewis in 1831 may have been used in a game called hnefatafl – an ancient Viking board game that pre-dates chess.

ome of the Lewis Chessmen may not have been chessmen at all according to new research. The and century gaming pieces which were discovered in Uig on the Isle of Lewis in 1831 are considered to be Scotland’s most renowned archaeological find.

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