Civil War Battle of Chancellorsville | ... the Battle of Chancellorsville. (AP Photo/Library of Congress

The Pennsylvania Infantry camp on Belle Plain, Virginia, is pictured in March three weeks before the Battle of Chancellorsville. (AP Photo/Library of Congress) The Civil War, Part The Places - In Focus - The Atlantic

05/01/1863 - In Virginia, the Battle of Chancellorsville began. General Robert E. Lee's forces began fighting with Union troops under General Joseph Hooker. Confederate General Stonewall Jackson was mortally wounded by his own soldiers in this battle. (May 1-4

- In Virginia, the Battle of Chancellorsville began. General Robert E. Lee's forces began fighting with Union troops under General Joseph Hooker. Confederate General Stonewall Jackson was mortally wounded by his own soldiers in this battle.

Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson arrived at West Point unprepared and uneducated. He failed his first entrance exam. A loner, he worked diligently to improve his class ranking and graduated 17th. in the Class of 1846. His worst grades, like U.S. Grant's, in infantry tactics.

Confederate pickets accidentally shot him at the Battle of Chancellorsville on May The general survived with the loss of an arm to amputation, but died of complications from pneumonia eight days later.

Chancellorsville, Battle of [Credit: MPI/Hulton Archive/Getty Images]

A Glorious Army: Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days to Gettysburg, by Jeffry D.

Corporal G.H. Swift, Company C, 18th Massachusetts, was injured at the battle of Chancellorsville, Va. on May 3, 1863, when a musket ball fractured the top of his skull. Surgeons attempted to trephine the wound but halted the procedure upon discovering that the inner surface of the skull was not fractured. Corporal Swift died on May 17.

ratak-monodosico: “ Corporal G. Swift, Company C, Massachusetts, was injured at the battle of Chancellorsville, Va. on May when a musket ball fractured the top of his skull. Surgeons attempted to trephine the wound but halted the.

William F. Tilson. This photo depicts William F. Tilson. He was a member of Company E, Second United States Sharpshooters. He was a 5 foot 11 inch tall, 16 year old, when he tried out for the Sharpshooters on November 9, 1861. He was a Vermont farmer whot took pride in his shooting skills. He was accepted into the ranks of Company E, but proved to be a bit of a discipline problem. He first saw action in the brutal Battle of Antietam. He also saw service in the Battles of Chancellorsville and…

William F. Tilson. This photo depicts William F. Tilson. He was a member of Company E, Second United States Sharpshooters. He was a 5 foot 11 inch tall, 16 year old, when he tried out for the Sharpshooters on November 9, 1861. He was a Vermont farmer whot took pride in his shooting skills. He was accepted into the ranks of Company E, but proved to be a bit of a discipline problem. He first saw action in the brutal Battle of Antietam. He also saw service in the Battles of Chancellorsville and…

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