Sister Antona Ebo, a Franciscan nun who marched across the Selma Bridge in 1965

Sister Mary Antona Ebo, of the Sisters of St. Louis, talks to the media about black voting rights during a civil rights protest in Selma, Ala.

In honor of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson #change #equalrights

This book recounts the three months of protest that took place before Dr.'s landmark march from Selma, Alabama, to Montgomery to promote equal rights and help African-Americans earn the right to vote.

On Aug. 6, 1965, the Voting Rights Act was signed into law. African American voters in rural Wilcox Cty., Ala., able to vote for the FIRST time after the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, line up in front of a polling station at The Sugar Shack. May, 1966  -IN MY LIFETIME-

On Aug. THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT was signed into law. ~ Photo: African American voters in rural Wilcox Cty., able to vote for the first time after the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, line up in front of a polling station at The Sugar Shack.

Baldwin & Baez • Selma to Montgomery march

James Baldwin, Joan Baez, and James Forman (left to right) enter Montgomery, Alabama on the Selma to Montgomery march for voting rights,

15th Amendment, passed 1869, ratified 1870. That's right people. Republicans! Same ones who freed the slaves.

The real truth! Demoncrats have never wanted blacks to succeed.if demoncrats were so them and the poor, why are they still all so poor? It's lies lies lies.

Septima Clark (5/3/1898 - 12/15/1987) Mrs. Clark, a teacher in South Carolina, established Citizenship Schools throughout the South to teach reading and increase voter eligibility. Quote: "I have a great belief in the fact that whenever there is chaos, it creates wonderful thinking. I consider chaos a gift."

7 Of The Most Unrecognized Women in Black History

Known as the "Grandmother of the American Civil Rights Movement." Septima Poinsette Clark was an educator and civil rights activist who played a major role in voting rights of African Americans.

African Americans vote in Alabama in 1966, in the wake of the Voting Rights Act.  (Photograph © Flip Schulke/CORBIS)

Voter Suppression Returns

Black americans vote in alabama in in the wake of the voting rights act. (photo: © flip schulke/corbis) Bless you Momma!

It is truly astounding that less than 100 years ago, American women did not have the right to vote. This Women's History Month, we reflect on our progress and fight for the next victory that will seem just as obvious 100 years from now.

27 Badass Images Of Women Winning And Exercising The Right To Vote

A gorgeous expression of unity between black and white. I am referring to both voting rights marches and that sweet houndstooth coat.

March 1965: Participants in a black voting rights march through Alabama. On the third attempt, Dr Martin Luther King successfully led the march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery

March Participants in a black voting rights march through Alabama. On the third attempt, Dr Martin Luther King successfully led the march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery

School That Allowed Teen to Dr0wn During Field Trip Calls Father to Inquire About Absences | Your Black World

School That Allowed Teen to During Field Trip Calls Father to Inquire About Absences

Diane Nash - A leader & strategist of the student wing of the Civil Rights Movement, Diane Nash was a member of the Freedom Riders. She also helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) & the Selma Voting Rights Committee campaign, which helped blacks in the South to vote & have political power. A bright, focused, utterly fearless woman, with an unerring instinct for the correct tactical move at each increment of the crisis; a leader, with flawless instincts.

7 Of The Most Unrecognized Women in Black History

Diane Nash - A leader & strategist of the student wing of the Civil Rights Movement, Diane Nash was a member of the Freedom Riders. She also helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) & the Selma Voting Rights Committee campaign, wh

Iconic images of the civil rights movement:March 1965:  Children watching a black voting rights march in Alabama. Dr Martin Luther King led the march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery.  (Photo by William Lovelace/Express/Getty Images)

Iconic images of the civil rights movement:March 1965: Children watching a black voting rights march in Alabama. Dr Martin Luther King led the march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery. (Photo by William Lovelace/Express/Getty Images)

“I guess if I’d had any sense, I’d have been a little scared – but what was the point of being scared? The only thing they could do was kill me, and it kinda seemed like they’d been trying to do that a little bit at a time since I could remember.”  - Spoken by Fannie Lou Hamer, a civil rights and voting rights leader, on why she put her life in danger when she volunteered to register to vote. She later became a key organizer in the Mississippi Freedom Summer 1964.

Fannie Lou Hamer

Fannie Lou Hamer American civil rights leader, fought in the for blacks to have the right to vote. She went on to help blacks get elected and to fight against poverty.

Fannie Lou Hamer was ‘sick and tired of being sick and tired,’ and she told the…

52 years ago, this speech changed the course of black voting rights in America Fannie Lou Hamer was ‘sick and tired of being sick and tired,’ and she told the 1964 Democratic National Convention

King and his wife lead a black voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, on March 30, 1965.

MLK Day, in your own words

March American civil rights campaigner Martin Luther King - and his wife Coretta Scott King lead a black voting rights march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery. (Photo by William Lovelace/Express/Getty Images)

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