MonarchWatch.org - outreach group based at the University of Kansas "that focuses on the monarch butterfly, its habitat, and its spectacular fall migration."  Detailed information about milkweed types and growth and how to attract Monarchs (includes kits for growing your own).

MonarchWatch.org - outreach group based at the University of Kansas "that focuses on the monarch butterfly, its habitat, and its spectacular fall migration." Detailed information about milkweed types and growth and how to attract Monarchs (includes kits for growing your own).

Bring back the real A-frame, "the right shape at the right time ...

Bring back the real A-frame, "the right shape at the right time ...

Considering the fact it's been proven that she didn't start the hashtag, Charing wonders why Ramaa Mosley is getting credit for #BringBackOurGirls?

Considering the fact it's been proven that she didn't start the hashtag, Charing wonders why Ramaa Mosley is getting credit for #BringBackOurGirls?

You know you want this badass Victorian scientist to glower at you from a corner of your desk accompanied by her massive steampunkish Analytical Engine and an oversized spanner.

You know you want this badass Victorian scientist to glower at you from a corner of your desk accompanied by her massive steampunkish Analytical Engine and an oversized spanner.

Boom! NASA Wants to Bring Back Supersonic X-Planes | The X-24B was one of a series of planes designed to investigate how spacecraft could handle reentry into Earth's atmosphere.  | Credit: NASA | From Wired.com

Boom! NASA Wants to Bring Back Supersonic X-Planes | The X-24B was one of a series of planes designed to investigate how spacecraft could handle reentry into Earth's atmosphere. | Credit: NASA | From Wired.com

Boom! NASA Wants to Bring Back Supersonic X-Planes | The Bell X-1, NASA's first "x-plane," was the first aircraft to break the supposed sound barrier (or Mach 1) on Oct. 14, 1947, piloted by Chuck Yeager. | Credit: NASA | From Wired.com

Boom! NASA Wants to Bring Back Supersonic X-Planes | The Bell X-1, NASA's first "x-plane," was the first aircraft to break the supposed sound barrier (or Mach 1) on Oct. 14, 1947, piloted by Chuck Yeager. | Credit: NASA | From Wired.com

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