While most people remember Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, they forget that the Montgomery Bus Boycott succeeded because of the participation of tens of thousands of ordinary people.  These women and men risked their lives and jobs to keep the boycott alive.  Many, like this woman, walked instead of riding the segregated buses.

While most people remember Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, they forget that the Montgomery Bus Boycott succeeded because of the participation of tens of thousands of ordinary people. These women and men risked their lives and jobs to keep the boycott alive. Many, like this woman, walked instead of riding the segregated buses.

The No. 2857 bus on which Rosa Parks was riding on December 1, 1955 in Montgomery, Alabama when she was arrested for her refusal to give up her seat to a white person which sparked the Civil Rights Movement.

The No. 2857 bus on which Rosa Parks was riding on December 1, 1955 in Montgomery, Alabama when she was arrested for her refusal to give up her seat to a white person which sparked the Civil Rights Movement.

This fun, hands-on project has students creating their own bus after reading the story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott to help your students get to know a civil rights hero!

This fun, hands-on project has students creating their own bus after reading the story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott to help your students get to know a civil rights hero!

Rosa Parks being fingerprinted during 1956 arrest for participation in the Montgomery bus boycott.

Rosa Parks being fingerprinted during 1956 arrest for participation in the Montgomery bus boycott.

On Dec. 5, 1955 the Montgomery Bus Boycott began, one of the most powerful stories of organizing and social change in U.S. history. Yet many people still associate it with an isolated act by Rosa Parks. Out of Montgomery’s 50,000 African American residents, 30,000-40,000 participated in the boycott. For 381 days, they walked, bicycled or car-pooled, depriving the bus company of a substantial portion of its revenue. ©Don Cravens/Time Life/Getty Images.

On Dec. 5, 1955 the Montgomery Bus Boycott began, one of the most powerful stories of organizing and social change in U.S. history. Yet many people still associate it with an isolated act by Rosa Parks. Out of Montgomery’s 50,000 African American residents, 30,000-40,000 participated in the boycott. For 381 days, they walked, bicycled or car-pooled, depriving the bus company of a substantial portion of its revenue. ©Don Cravens/Time Life/Getty Images.

Rosa Parks refusal to give up her bus seat to a white man indirectly led to some of the most significant civil rights legislation of American history. She sought to play down her role in the civil rights struggle but for her peaceful and dignified campaigning she became one of the most well respected figures in the civil rights movements.

Rosa Parks refusal to give up her bus seat to a white man indirectly led to some of the most significant civil rights legislation of American history. She sought to play down her role in the civil rights struggle but for her peaceful and dignified campaigning she became one of the most well respected figures in the civil rights movements.

Non-Violent Protests - the Eyes on the Prize website has resources for exploring the 1960 civil rights movement.

Non-Violent Protests - the Eyes on the Prize website has resources for exploring the 1960 civil rights movement.

December 1, 1955 In response to the Rosa Parks incident, a bus boycott in Montgomery, a political and and social protest campaign came about. The main purpose and goal of the bus boycott was to oppose the city's policy of racial segregation on public transportation. This boycott lasted from December 1, 1955 until December 20, 1956, and ended with a United States Supreme Court ruling that Alabama and Montgomery laws requiring segregated buses unconstitutional.

December 1, 1955 In response to the Rosa Parks incident, a bus boycott in Montgomery, a political and and social protest campaign came about. The main purpose and goal of the bus boycott was to oppose the city's policy of racial segregation on public transportation. This boycott lasted from December 1, 1955 until December 20, 1956, and ended with a United States Supreme Court ruling that Alabama and Montgomery laws requiring segregated buses unconstitutional.

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