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laterial view of human brain arteries Brocas Wernicke's | left lateral view functional areas cerebral cortex motor sensory ...

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Lateral view of the cerebral cortex showing the principal gyri and sulci. Major structures include the central sulcus and the precentral (primary motor), premotor, and postcentral (primary somatosensory) gyri. Also note the gyri situated rostral to the premotor cortex, including the orbital gyri, which mediate higher order intellectual functions and contribute to the regulation of emotional behavior. Brocas motor speech area and Wernickes area (for reception of speech) are important areas…

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parasagittal view of cerebral cortex primary motor sensory association multimodal functional areas

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Accurately depicts the brain from four different views using color-coding to show the anatomy and functional areas. Labels for the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, brainstem, frontal lobes, temporal lobes, parietal lobes, occipital lobes and pituitary gland. To the left are color-code keys depicting functional areas for vision, association, motor function, Broca's speech, hearing, emotions, sensation, smell, written language, cognition and base motor functions like balance, equilibrium and…

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' For the first time, the group found microscopic tissue growth in the brain continues in regions that also show changes in function. The work overturns a central thought in neuroscience, which is that the amount of brain tissue goes in one direction throughout our lives – from too much to just enough. A pair of studies now published in issues of Science and Cerebral Cortex.' Study shows development of face recognition entails brain tissue growth:

Have You Had a Stroke? You May Experience a Visual Illusion

What Is a Visual Illusion?: Visual Illusions can be the result of a stroke in the occipital lobe, seen in blue at the back of the brain

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Intrinsic Functional Relations Between Human Cerebral Cortex and Thalamus

The top image shows the four main sections of the cerebral cortex: the frontal lobe, the parietal lobe, the occipital lobe, and the temporal lobe. Functions such as movement are controlled by the motor cortex, and the sensory cortex receives information on vision, hearing, speech, and other senses. The bottom image shows the location of the brain's major internal structures.

Lateral view of the cerebral cortex showing the principal gyri and sulci. Major structures include the central sulcus and the precentral (primary motor), premotor, and postcentral (primary somatosensory) gyri. Also note the gyri situated rostral to the premotor cortex, including the orbital gyri, which mediate higher order intellectual functions and contribute to the regulation of emotional behavior. Brocas motor speech area and Wernickes area (for reception of speech) are important areas…

Experimental Cancer Drug Reverses Schizophrenia in Adolescent Mice - NeuroscienceNews.com Researchers chemically turned down the expression of a gene known as Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), whose protein appears to regulate the fate of neurons in the cerebral cortex responsible for “higher-order” functions, like information processing. This image shows the location of the cerebral cortex in the human brain.

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Occipital Lobes

How the Occipital Lobes Helps You See Color: The occipital lobes are positioned at the back region of the cerebral cortex.

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Human Brain The brain is the most complex organ in the human body made up of over 100 billion nerve cells. It controls the central and peripheral nervous systems and regulates most human activity. This collection looks at the structure and function of the brain and covers a number of the diseases to which it is susceptible. Cerebral Cortex Ari Berkowitz Published online: April 2012 Basal Ganglia and The Regulation of Movement Robert S Turner Published online: September 2009

Autism Brain SPECT scan Part I-This video presents the use of Brain SPECT imaging to analyze the blood flow (i.e. related to metabolism) of the cerebral cortex in autism. The video is in two parts. Part I is about the experience of doing a SPECT brain imaging with a child with autism and one of his parents. Part II will explain a little more about what is known regarding the functions of cerebral cortex, and the results obtained from this analysis.

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