The Chinese Imperial Dog is a small breed of dog with a wrinkly, short-muzzled face, and curled tail. Kennel clubs originally classified the breed under the shih-tzu, before recognizing the Imperial as a separate breed

The Chinese Imperial Dog is a small breed of dog with a wrinkly, short-muzzled face, and curled tail. Kennel clubs originally classified the breed under the shih-tzu, before recognizing the Imperial as a separate breed

really cute foo dog tattoos | The Fu Dog or Foo Dog is a Chinese Imperial Guardian Lion.

The Three Celestial Guardians.

really cute foo dog tattoos | The Fu Dog or Foo Dog is a Chinese Imperial Guardian Lion.

Chinese Imperial Dog Breed Information and Pictures

Chinese Imperial Dog Breed Information and Pictures

Best of the best Shih Tzu in all colors & smaller packages... petite sizes from 3-9 lbs. (avg. 7-8lbs & 8-9in tall). Sometimes called imperial Shih Tzu, Miniature Shih Tzu; Chinese Imperial Dog; pocket puppies; purse puppies  www.ShowTymeShihTzu.com

Best of the best Shih Tzu in all colors & smaller packages... petite sizes from 3-9 lbs. (avg. 7-8lbs & 8-9in tall). Sometimes called imperial Shih Tzu, Miniature Shih Tzu; Chinese Imperial Dog; pocket puppies; purse puppies www.ShowTymeShihTzu.com

BuckNaked Imperial Shih Tzu  or Chinese Imperial Dog  bred by Debbie Jensen

BuckNaked Imperial Shih Tzu or Chinese Imperial Dog bred by Debbie Jensen

The origins of the Pekingese dog began with the breeding in the Chinese imperial court, perhaps as early as the Han Dynasty (206 BCE - 220 CE) period. The Chinese emperor wanted to replicate the Buddha's experience of taming a wild lion, symbolizing passion and aggression. Buddha's tame lion would "follow at his heels like a faithful dog," according to legend. In a somewhat circular story, then, the Han emperors bred a dog to make it look like a lion - a lion that acted like a faithful dog.

The origins of the Pekingese dog began with the breeding in the Chinese imperial court, perhaps as early as the Han Dynasty (206 BCE - 220 CE) period. The Chinese emperor wanted to replicate the Buddha's experience of taming a wild lion, symbolizing passion and aggression. Buddha's tame lion would "follow at his heels like a faithful dog," according to legend. In a somewhat circular story, then, the Han emperors bred a dog to make it look like a lion - a lion that acted like a faithful dog.

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