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Constantine I. R. 306-337. Constantine was the 1st Christian emperor. Constantine decided to establish a new Eastern capital representing the integration of the east into the Roman Empire as a whole. He settled on the Greek city of Byzantium, located in strategic spot. The residents spontaneously decided to rename the city Constantinople. Relics of the True Cross & the Rod of Moses protected the city. The Church of the Holy Apostles was built over a temple to Aphrodite. It was the “New…

Constantine I. R. 306-337. Constantine was the 1st Christian emperor. Constantine decided to establish a new Eastern capital representing the integration of the east into the Roman Empire as a whole. He settled on the Greek city of Byzantium, located in strategic spot. The residents spontaneously decided to rename the city Constantinople. Relics of the True Cross & the Rod of Moses protected the city. The Church of the Holy Apostles was built over a temple to Aphrodite. It was the “New…

Medallion of Constantine the Great, c.315 AD.  The Chi Rho symbol is visible on the headgear.

Medallion of Constantine the Great, c.315 AD. The Chi Rho symbol is visible on the headgear.

During the rule of Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (reigned 306–337), Christianity became a dominant religion of the Roman Empire

During the rule of Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (reigned 306–337), Christianity became a dominant religion of the Roman Empire

Licinius I Constantine The Great enemy 321AD Ancient Roman Coin Jupiter i53258 https://trustedmedievalcoins.wordpress.com/2015/12/18/licinius-i-constantine-the-great-enemy-321ad-ancient-roman-coin-jupiter-i53258/

Licinius I Constantine The Great enemy 321AD Ancient Roman Coin Jupiter i53258 https://trustedmedievalcoins.wordpress.com/2015/12/18/licinius-i-constantine-the-great-enemy-321ad-ancient-roman-coin-jupiter-i53258/

Christian Symbolism on coins of Constantine the Great

Christian Symbolism on coins of Constantine the Great

Emperor Constantine in the fourth century CE made the capital Constantinepole.  Separate emperors ruled from it after his death.  Pictured here is a bust of Constantine.

Emperor Constantine in the fourth century CE made the capital Constantinepole. Separate emperors ruled from it after his death. Pictured here is a bust of Constantine.

St. Helena-mother of Emperor Constantine the Great. She is traditionally credited with finding the relics of the True Cross,

St. Helena-mother of Emperor Constantine the Great. She is traditionally credited with finding the relics of the True Cross,

May 18 332 - Constantine the great announces free amounts of food to citizens in Constantinople

May 18 332 - Constantine the great announces free amounts of food to citizens in Constantinople

During the First Council of Nicaea in 325 C.E., the Roman emperor Constantine said, "… Let us then have nothing in common with the detestable Jewish crowd; for we have received from our Saviour a different way." In 329, he issued an edict providing for the death penalty for any non-Jew who embraced the Jewish faith, as well as for Jews who encouraged them. Jews were forbidden marriage to Christians, an edict echoed 1600 years later in the Nuremberg Laws in the 1930's.

During the First Council of Nicaea in 325 C.E., the Roman emperor Constantine said, "… Let us then have nothing in common with the detestable Jewish crowd; for we have received from our Saviour a different way." In 329, he issued an edict providing for the death penalty for any non-Jew who embraced the Jewish faith, as well as for Jews who encouraged them. Jews were forbidden marriage to Christians, an edict echoed 1600 years later in the Nuremberg Laws in the 1930's.

Colossal marble head of Emperor ConstantineThe age of Constantine marked a distinct epoch in the history of the Roman Empire. He built a new imperial residence at Byzantium and named it New Rome. However, in Constantine's honor, the Romans called it Constantinople, which would later be the capital of what is now known as the Byzantine Empire for over one thousand years. Because of this, he is thought of as the founder of the Byzantine Empire

Colossal marble head of Emperor ConstantineThe age of Constantine marked a distinct epoch in the history of the Roman Empire. He built a new imperial residence at Byzantium and named it New Rome. However, in Constantine's honor, the Romans called it Constantinople, which would later be the capital of what is now known as the Byzantine Empire for over one thousand years. Because of this, he is thought of as the founder of the Byzantine Empire

Bronze head of Constantine, from a colossal statue (4th century). Constantine the Great (Latin: Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus;[2] Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Μέγας; 27 February c. 272 AD[1] – 22 May 337 AD), also known as Constantine I or Saint Constantine (in the Orthodox Church as Saint Constantine the Great, Equal-to-the-Apostles).

Bronze head of Constantine, from a colossal statue (4th century). Constantine the Great (Latin: Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus;[2] Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Μέγας; 27 February c. 272 AD[1] – 22 May 337 AD), also known as Constantine I or Saint Constantine (in the Orthodox Church as Saint Constantine the Great, Equal-to-the-Apostles).