Salem: Who’s Real and Who’s Not

Salem: Who’s Real and Who’s Not

Cotton Mather, influential New England Puritan minister, portrait by Peter Pelham.

Wonders of the Invisible World by Cotton Mather was the first book ever published on the Salem Witch Trials

Best Books About the Salem Witch Trials

Wonders of the Invisible World by Cotton Mather was the first book ever published on the Salem Witch Trials

Five little-known facts in the history of vaccines, from Benjamin Franklin to Franklin D Roosevelt.

Five little-known facts in the history of vaccines, from Benjamin Franklin to Franklin D Roosevelt.

Cotton Mather's Memorable Providences, Relating to Witchcrafts and Possessions (1689)

Cotton Mather's Memorable Providences, Relating to Witchcrafts and Possessions (1689)

this website talks about cotton Mather's childhood. also tells about his life with his wife and kids.   by: Mya love

this website talks about cotton Mather's childhood. also tells about his life with his wife and kids. by: Mya love

Cotton Mather and Joseph Dudley: Allies and Enemies in 1695 - http://www.newenglandhistoricalsociety.com/cotton-mather-joseph-dudley-allies-enemies-1695/

Cotton Mather and Joseph Dudley: Allies and Enemies in 1695 - http://www.newenglandhistoricalsociety.com/cotton-mather-joseph-dudley-allies-enemies-1695/

This is a drawing of Cotton Mather.  Cotton Mather was born on February 12th, 1663 in Boston, Massachusetts.  Cotton Mather was a Puritan Minister who was, perhaps, best known for his participation in the Salem witch trials in the 1690’s.  Many of Cotton Mather’s writings led to the witchcraft hysteria and fueled the very superstitious people of the age to condemn many girls and women (and even a few men) to death.

This is a drawing of Cotton Mather. Cotton Mather was born on February 12th, 1663 in Boston, Massachusetts. Cotton Mather was a Puritan Minister who was, perhaps, best known for his participation in the Salem witch trials in the 1690’s. Many of Cotton Mather’s writings led to the witchcraft hysteria and fueled the very superstitious people of the age to condemn many girls and women (and even a few men) to death.

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