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Define Irony In Literature

from The Huffington Post

11 Quirky Teen Romances In Books

Quirkiness is like irony--hard to define, but you know it when you see it. Far more charming than weird, far less studied than cool, quirkiness is that i...

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from Teachers Pay Teachers

Irony in Literature Activity

This is an activity that I use every year as a refresher before I introduce my students to writing their first literary analysis. I also use it as a pre-reading activity for "Gift of the Magi" because it is so heavy with irony. Great refresher/intro to irony!Part 1- Read and discuss the article defining "Irony in Literature"Part 2- Complete practice worksheet_______________________________________________________________________Irony in Literature is licensed under a Creative Commons…

from Teachers Pay Teachers

Types of Irony in Literature No Prep Introductory Lesson & Worksheets

Introduce the three types of irony in literature: Dramatic Irony, Verbal Irony and Situational Irony. Everything you need to teach students to define, identify, analyze and write their own literary irony.NO PREP Print & Go: Worksheets & Lesson Plan for understanding, identifying and using Dramatic Irony, Verbal Irony and Situational Irony - in a fun & engaging way!!

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The great geniuses of classic Russian literature had extraordinary lives, and even their deaths became the final chapter in their works. Chekhov and Gogol’s last days were filled with the kind of peculiar events and irony that defined their respective works.

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satire... satire is the use of irony, sarcasm, or ridicule in exposing, denouncing, or deriding vice or folly. Jonathan Swift’s 1726 novel Gulliver’s Travels is an example of satirical fiction. Written in the style of travel writing of its day, Gulliver’s Travels also provides an example of parody, defined as “a humorous imitation of a serious piece of literature or writing.”

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from Teachers Pay Teachers

Literary Elements Diagnostic Check

Literary Elements Diagnostics Check: How many literary elements your students are familiar with? This document checks their knowledge of protagonist, antagonist, satire, point of view, setting, irony, rising and falling action- 50 vocabulary terms in all. The other document asks to read a short story, and gives questions using literary elements to gauge student understanding, such as which point of view, who is the antagonist, can you define irony- 12 questions in all. Grades 6-12. $

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"George Orwell lived here." Irony? If you can turn in your grave, while pissing yourself laughing ...........