The Dieppe Raid, also known as the Battle of Dieppe, Operation Rutter and, later, Operation Jubilee, was a Second World War Allied attack on the German-occupied port of Dieppe. The raid took place on the northern coast of France on 19 August 1942. The assault began at 5:00 a.m. and by 10:50 a.m. the Allied commanders were forced to call a retreat. Over 6,000 infantrymen, predominantly Canadian, were supported by limited Royal Navy and large Royal Air Force contingents.

The Dieppe Raid, also known as the Battle of Dieppe, Operation Rutter and, later, Operation Jubilee, was a Second World War Allied attack on the German-occupied port of Dieppe. The raid took place on the northern coast of France on 19 August 1942. The assault began at 5:00 a.m. and by 10:50 a.m. the Allied commanders were forced to call a retreat. Over 6,000 infantrymen, predominantly Canadian, were supported by limited Royal Navy and large Royal Air Force contingents.

Canadian soldier with Thompson SMG and German PW captured during the Dieppe raid, 19 Aug 1942.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3592340)

Canadian soldier with Thompson SMG and German PW captured during the Dieppe raid, 19 Aug 1942. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3592340)

#331 RAF Squadron, Spitfire. was a Second World War squadron of the Royal Air Force. The squadron was primarily manned with Norwegian aircrew. The squadron was part of Fighter Command between 1941 and March 1944 when it joined the 2nd Tactical Air Force until the end of the war. The squadron took part in the Dieppe Raid and the Normandy landings.

#331 RAF Squadron, Spitfire. was a Second World War squadron of the Royal Air Force. The squadron was primarily manned with Norwegian aircrew. The squadron was part of Fighter Command between 1941 and March 1944 when it joined the 2nd Tactical Air Force until the end of the war. The squadron took part in the Dieppe Raid and the Normandy landings.

(10/12) German soldiers stand behind a barbed wire obstacle on the beaches of Dieppe, among dozens of helmets, likely left behind by Allied prisoners after the 19 August 1942 Dieppe Raid.

(10/12) German soldiers stand behind a barbed wire obstacle on the beaches of Dieppe, among dozens of helmets, likely left behind by Allied prisoners after the 19 August 1942 Dieppe Raid.

(9/12) German soldiers inspect the beaches littered with Allied casualties and equipment after the 19 August 1942 Dieppe Raid. The Churchill tank on the right is labelled "BELLICOSE".

(9/12) German soldiers inspect the beaches littered with Allied casualties and equipment after the 19 August 1942 Dieppe Raid. The Churchill tank on the right is labelled "BELLICOSE".

A German prisoner being escorted at Newhaven. He was captured during the Dieppe Raid by No. 4 Commando, 1942

A German prisoner being escorted at Newhaven. He was captured during the Dieppe Raid by No. 4 Commando, 1942

Source: en.wikipedia.com Credibility: Wikipedia has become much more reliable as they better check what people write before posting. What it tells us: This picture tells/shows us one of the many Canadians that died during the Dieppe Raid. Though the Dieppe Raid was ultimately a failure it much better prepared Canada for D-Day, Canada was no longer off-guard and inexperienced.

Source: en.wikipedia.com Credibility: Wikipedia has become much more reliable as they better check what people write before posting. What it tells us: This picture tells/shows us one of the many Canadians that died during the Dieppe Raid. Though the Dieppe Raid was ultimately a failure it much better prepared Canada for D-Day, Canada was no longer off-guard and inexperienced.

The Dieppe Raid and the failure of the churchill tank | World War II Social Place

The Dieppe Raid and the failure of the churchill tank | World War II Social Place

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