Dryococelus australis, male

Dryococelus australis, male

Dryococelus australis, female; eggs

Dryococelus australis, female; eggs

Dryococelus australis, the Lord Howe Island stick insect or tree lobster, is a species of stick insect which lives on the Lord Howe Island Group. It was thought to be extinct by 1930, only to be rediscovered in 2001. It is extinct in its largest habitat, Lord Howe Island, and has been called "the rarest insect in the world", as the rediscovered population consisted of only 24(!) individuals living on the world's tallest (and rocky and treeles) sea stack of Ball's Pyramid, under a single…

Dryococelus australis, the Lord Howe Island stick insect or tree lobster, is a species of stick insect which lives on the Lord Howe Island Group. It was thought to be extinct by 1930, only to be rediscovered in 2001. It is extinct in its largest habitat, Lord Howe Island, and has been called "the rarest insect in the world", as the rediscovered population consisted of only 24(!) individuals living on the world's tallest (and rocky and treeles) sea stack of Ball's Pyramid, under a single…

This is not real, photo shopped or glued together pieces

This is not real, photo shopped or glued together pieces

The Lord Howe Island stick insect, presumed extinct for 80 years, was rediscovered on nearby Ball's Pyramid in 2001. The species is currently part of a conservation breeding program at the Melbourne Zoo while the Australian government decides whether or not they should be reintroduced to Lord Howe Island.

Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years

The Lord Howe Island stick insect, presumed extinct for 80 years, was rediscovered on nearby Ball's Pyramid in 2001. The species is currently part of a conservation breeding program at the Melbourne Zoo while the Australian government decides whether or not they should be reintroduced to Lord Howe Island.

El nacimiento de un insecto palo (la supervivencia de Dryococelus australis)

El nacimiento de un insecto palo (la supervivencia de Dryococelus australis)

Dryococelus australis, commonly known as the Lord Howe Island stick insect or tree lobster, is a species of stick insect which lives on the Lord Howe Island Group. It was thought to be extinct by 1920, only to be rediscovered in 2001. It is extinct in its largest habitat, Lord Howe Island, and has been called "the rarest insect in the world", as the rediscovered population consisted of 24 individuals living on the small islet of Ball's Pyramid.

Dryococelus australis, commonly known as the Lord Howe Island stick insect or tree lobster, is a species of stick insect which lives on the Lord Howe Island Group. It was thought to be extinct by 1920, only to be rediscovered in 2001. It is extinct in its largest habitat, Lord Howe Island, and has been called "the rarest insect in the world", as the rediscovered population consisted of 24 individuals living on the small islet of Ball's Pyramid.

Nymph, Dryococelus australis was thought to be extinct, following the accidental introduction of rats to Lord Howe Island in 1918, but has since been discovered on a small volcanic outcrop called Ball’s Pyramid.

Nymph, Dryococelus australis was thought to be extinct, following the accidental introduction of rats to Lord Howe Island in 1918, but has since been discovered on a small volcanic outcrop called Ball’s Pyramid.

Dryococelus australis, Lord Howe stick insect (nhm, 2013)

Dryococelus australis, Lord Howe stick insect (nhm, 2013)

Land Lobsters (Dryococelus australis). Gigantic stick insects. Found on Ball's Pyramid, Australia

7 Extreme Bugs and Creepy-Crawlies

Land Lobsters (Dryococelus australis). Gigantic stick insects. Found on Ball's Pyramid, Australia

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