The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. In the Edict, Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity.[1] The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance.

The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. In the Edict, Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity.[1] The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance.

Des guerres de religion à la mort d’Henri IV (1562-1610) | Musée virtuel du Protestantisme ... Edict of Nantes

Des guerres de religion à la mort d’Henri IV (1562-1610) | Musée virtuel du Protestantisme ... Edict of Nantes

Finally, in October 1685, Louis XIV issued the Edict of Fontainebleau which formally revoked the Edict of Nantes and declared Protestantism illegal in France. This act, more commonly known as the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, was the culmination of the increasing persecution against the Huguenots and it resulted in the destruction of Huguenot churches, the closure of Protestant schools and increased pressure and intimidation to convert to Catholicism. Those who refused to swear…

Finally, in October 1685, Louis XIV issued the Edict of Fontainebleau which formally revoked the Edict of Nantes and declared Protestantism illegal in France. This act, more commonly known as the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, was the culmination of the increasing persecution against the Huguenots and it resulted in the destruction of Huguenot churches, the closure of Protestant schools and increased pressure and intimidation to convert to Catholicism. Those who refused to swear…

Huguenot stamp~my Ancestors.  Andre Picon & Ester Jeanne Bonneau left La Rochelle, France during the Edict of Nantes.  Arriving in Scotland then to Ireland. Andre Picon held a position in the Court of King Louis XIV (King of France) : Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

Huguenot stamp~my Ancestors. Andre Picon & Ester Jeanne Bonneau left La Rochelle, France during the Edict of Nantes. Arriving in Scotland then to Ireland. Andre Picon held a position in the Court of King Louis XIV (King of France) : Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

Torture of Huguenots in France after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, 1685.

Torture Of Huguenots In France Canvas Print / Canvas Art by Everett

Torture of Huguenots in France after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, 1685.

Nantes, a city in West France, located on the Loire River, is the 6th largest in France. During the Wars of Religion, Nantes supported the Catholic League and the governor of Brittany, the Duke of Mercoeur, in his fight against the Protestants. The town was one of the last to recognise the authority of Henri IV, which meant that the edict of Nantes, a decree guaranteeing the right of worship to Protestants, did not reflect the majority opinion of the inhabitants.

Nantes, a city in West France, located on the Loire River, is the 6th largest in France. During the Wars of Religion, Nantes supported the Catholic League and the governor of Brittany, the Duke of Mercoeur, in his fight against the Protestants. The town was one of the last to recognise the authority of Henri IV, which meant that the edict of Nantes, a decree guaranteeing the right of worship to Protestants, did not reflect the majority opinion of the inhabitants.

A George III oak-cased eight-day longcase clock Peter Amyot, Norwich (1733 - 1799) Peter Amyot (1733 - 1799) was of French Huguenot descent. The first immigrant from his family, Thomas, came to England at the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 and settled in the parish of St Peter Mancroft in Norwich. Peter was a distinguished clock and watch maker, working first at White Lion Lane then at 19 Haymarket, and, newly in partnership with his apprentice James Bennett (1760 - 1845), at No.2…

A George III oak-cased eight-day longcase clock Peter Amyot, Norwich (1733 - 1799) Peter Amyot (1733 - 1799) was of French Huguenot descent. The first immigrant from his family, Thomas, came to England at the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 and settled in the parish of St Peter Mancroft in Norwich. Peter was a distinguished clock and watch maker, working first at White Lion Lane then at 19 Haymarket, and, newly in partnership with his apprentice James Bennett (1760 - 1845), at No.2…

Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes and ordered the destruction of Huguenot churches, as well as the closing of Protestant schools. This policy made official the persecution already enforced since the dragonnades created in 1681 by the king in order to intimidate Huguenots into converting to Catholicism. As a result of the officially sanctioned persecution by the dragoons who were billeted upon prominent Huguenots, a large number of Protestants — estimates range from 210,000 to 900,000 —…

Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes and ordered the destruction of Huguenot churches, as well as the closing of Protestant schools. This policy made official the persecution already enforced since the dragonnades created in 1681 by the king in order to intimidate Huguenots into converting to Catholicism. As a result of the officially sanctioned persecution by the dragoons who were billeted upon prominent Huguenots, a large number of Protestants — estimates range from 210,000 to 900,000 —…

Louis XIV revoking the Edict of Nantes

Louis XIV revoking the Edict of Nantes

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