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November 1919 'The new silhouette', as it has been exemplified by the collections, is so varied & so individual that it is impossible to speak of it in the singular," we are told, as fur (be it beaver, chinchilla skunk, mole, seal or squirrel), is hailed as the winter must-have and jumpers are also a considered a wardrobe staple.

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from British Vogue

Magazine Issue

December 1917 Couturiers such as Premet and Lanvin are credited with making "the Parisienne's frocks with that same war-time simplicity that nowadays invariably characterizes her street costumes", "tunics and coats are long this season; and rabbit fur is very short – it's been clipped, in fact," and "not since Victorian days has the muffling scarf of wool been so honoured a member of the mode; it even forms an integral part of the coat".

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October 1918 "With the enemy thirty miles from Paris, with long-range guns booming and shells bursting, with shattered window-panes and streets littered with debris, the great couturiers of Paris held their Winter Fashion Openings according to their immemorial custom. As this number of Vogue goes to press the war news continues to thrill and cheer even the most apathetic pessimists -

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June 1921 - While the editor firmly assures readers that "the cape continues its triumphant progress", she also urges them to invest in hats and dresses this June, in particular those made of handkerchief linen. "A mode may be simple and yet not subdued," she says.

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What ladies of the upper classes read: September 1916 issue of British VOGUE is something the Crawley girls and their lady's maids would have subscribed to. It was essentially the same as American VOGUE, with British advertisers and spelling. Undoubtedly, the female servants would have had access to the, no longer wanted issues. French VOGUE was first issued in 1920.

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