A portrait of Jarena Lee, the first African American woman to publish an autobiography. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “10 Famous African Americans in 17th & 18th Century History.” http://blog.genealogybank.com/10-notable-african-americans-in-17th-18th-century-history.html

A portrait of Jarena Lee, the first African American woman to publish an autobiography. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “10 Famous African Americans in 17th & 18th Century History.” http://blog.genealogybank.com/10-notable-african-americans-in-17th-18th-century-history.html

Though born into slavery Biddy Mason gained freedom for herself and her children in 1856. Only ten years later she had saved enough money to purchase property, making her the first African American woman to own land in Los Angeles. A nurse and midwife by profession, she helped found the first elementary school for African American children in Los Angeles,

Though born into slavery Biddy Mason gained freedom for herself and her children in 1856. Only ten years later she had saved enough money to purchase property, making her the first African American woman to own land in Los Angeles. A nurse and midwife by profession, she helped found the first elementary school for African American children in Los Angeles,

Marjorie Lee Browne - one of the first African American women to receive a Doctorate in mathematics.  Alma mater - University of Michigan

Marjorie Lee Browne - one of the first African American women to receive a Doctorate in mathematics. Alma mater - University of Michigan

Dr. Georgia Rooks Dwelle: In 1900, she became the first Spelman College alumna to attend medical school. Dr. Dwelle established the Dwelle Infirmary (1920) in Atlanta. It was Georgia's first general hospital for African Americans, and its first obstetrical hospital for African American women. The infirmary, which also featured a pediatric clinic, was Georgia's first venereal disease clinic for African Americans, and offered Atlanta's first "Mother's Club" for African American women.

Dr. Georgia Rooks Dwelle: In 1900, she became the first Spelman College alumna to attend medical school. Dr. Dwelle established the Dwelle Infirmary (1920) in Atlanta. It was Georgia's first general hospital for African Americans, and its first obstetrical hospital for African American women. The infirmary, which also featured a pediatric clinic, was Georgia's first venereal disease clinic for African Americans, and offered Atlanta's first "Mother's Club" for African American women.

Famous African-American Women Paper Dolls (Dover paper doll books are the BEST -- and very inexpensive!)

Famous African-American Women Paper Dolls (Dover paper doll books are the BEST -- and very inexpensive!)

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