Fight or Flight Response --- Sympathetic vs. Parasympathetic Nervous Systems --- How the nervous system helps us defend ourselves.

Fight or Flight Response --- Sympathetic vs. Parasympathetic Nervous Systems --- How the nervous system helps us defend ourselves.

Fight-or-Flight Response (Biology)

Fight-or-Flight Response (Biology)

How the Fight-or-Flight Response Prepares Your Body to Take Action: The fight-or-flight response prepares your body to deal with stressors.

How the Fight-or-Flight Response Prepares Your Body to Take Action

How the Fight-or-Flight Response Prepares Your Body to Take Action: The fight-or-flight response prepares your body to deal with stressors.

Fight Or Flight Response

Fight Or Flight Response

How the Fight-or-Flight Response Prepares Your Body to Take Action

How the Fight-or-Flight Response Prepares Your Body to Take Action

The fight-or-flight response is a physiological reaction that either prepares our bodies to stay and fight or to flee. Learn how this response works.

RESPONDING POSITIVELY TO AMYGDALA HIJACK   Emotions associated with fight or flight response, for instance; anger or fear are activated in the primitive part of our brain called the ‘amygdala’. When the amygdala perceives a threat, it can lead that person to react irrationally and destructively. Adrenaline and cortisol hormones are released. Adrenaline increases your heart rate, elevates your blood pressure and boosts energy supplies. Cortisol, the primary stress hormone, increases sugars

RESPONDING POSITIVELY TO AMYGDALA HIJACK Emotions associated with fight or flight response, for instance; anger or fear are activated in the primitive part of our brain called the ‘amygdala’. When the amygdala perceives a threat, it can lead that person to react irrationally and destructively. Adrenaline and cortisol hormones are released. Adrenaline increases your heart rate, elevates your blood pressure and boosts energy supplies. Cortisol, the primary stress hormone, increases sugars

The ‘lump’ you feel in your throat when you’re scared, nervous, or crying is a fight-or-flight response that causes your airway to expand in order to provide you with more oxygen.  Source

The ‘lump’ you feel in your throat when you’re scared, nervous, or crying is a fight-or-flight response that causes your airway to expand in order to provide you with more oxygen. Source

Fight or Flight response. Quick video that explains the physiology behind the response. Use it with PTSD kids and go into discussing how their fight or flight is in some ways stuck on. Discuss trauma triggers, bodily reactions, and coping skills

Fight or Flight response. Quick video that explains the physiology behind the response. Use it with PTSD kids and go into discussing how their fight or flight is in some ways stuck on. Discuss trauma triggers, bodily reactions, and coping skills

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