In fluid dynamics, we like to classify flows as laminar—smooth and orderly—or turbulent—chaotic and seemingly random—but rarely is any given flow one or the other. Many flows start out laminar and then transition to turbulence. Often this is due to the introduction of a tiny perturbation which grows due to the flow’s instability and ultimately provokes transition. An instability can typically take more than one form in a given flow, based on the characteristic lengths, velocities, etc. of…

In fluid dynamics, we like to classify flows as laminar—smooth and orderly—or turbulent—chaotic and seemingly random—but rarely is any given flow one or the other. Many flows start out laminar and then transition to turbulence. Often this is due to the introduction of a tiny perturbation which grows due to the flow’s instability and ultimately provokes transition. An instability can typically take more than one form in a given flow, based on the characteristic lengths, velocities, etc. of…

Food Coloring, Fluid Dynamics, and an Awesome Lab Demo | Science-Based Life

Food Coloring, Fluid Dynamics, and an Awesome Lab Demo

Fluid Dynamics Matted Fractal Print by infinitecreature on Etsy

Fluid Dynamics, Matted Fractal Print

Pasadena teacher Von Carman famous for Karman's Vortex Street. When Madelbrot got to CalTech he discovered that von Carman was staying in Paris! Credit Sanjay Kumar and George Laughlin

Pasadena teacher Von Carman famous for Karman's Vortex Street. When Madelbrot got to CalTech he discovered that von Carman was staying in Paris! Credit Sanjay Kumar and George Laughlin

Droplets of oleic acid spread across a thin film of glycerol on a silicon wafer. The shapes here are driven by hydrodynamic instabilities, particularly Marangoni effects due to the differences in surface tension between the two fluids. (Photo credit: A. Darhuber, B. Fischer and S. Troian) #Photography #Fluid_Dynamics #Surface_Tension

Droplets of oleic acid spread across a thin film of glycerol on a silicon wafer. The shapes here are driven by hydrodynamic instabilities, particularly Marangoni effects due to the differences in surface tension between the two fluids. (Photo credit: A. Darhuber, B. Fischer and S. Troian) #Photography #Fluid_Dynamics #Surface_Tension

Inverted Drafting
Inverted drafting happens when a leading object encounters less drag than the object behind it. An example is when flows encounter passive objects, like flags, arranged one behind the other. Flags are considered passive because they flop around with every shifting breeze, unlike humans who are considered rigid objects.

In this image, two white, S-shaped lines are flags oriented one behind the other. The flag in the follower position cuts into the wake given off by the…

The Weird and Beautiful World of Fluid Dynamics

Inverted Drafting Inverted drafting happens when a leading object encounters less drag than the object behind it. An example is when flows encounter passive objects, like flags, arranged one behind the other. Flags are considered passive because they flop around with every shifting breeze, unlike humans who are considered rigid objects. In this image, two white, S-shaped lines are flags oriented one behind the other. The flag in the follower position cuts into the wake given off by the…

Fluid Dynamics GIFs

Get Lost in These Trippy Fluid Dynamics GIFs

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