Steneosaurus bollensis - Steneosaurus is an extinct genus of teleosaurid crocodyliform from the Early Jurassic to Middle Jurassic (Toarcian to Callovian). Fossil specimens have been found in England, France, Germany, Switzerland and Morocco. The largest species, S. heberti, reached up to 5 m (16.5 ft) long, though 2.5–3.5 m was far more common Species in this genus are traditionally classed into two skull groups: longirostrine (long, narrow jaws) and brevirostrine (short, broad jaws)

Steneosaurus bollensis - Steneosaurus is an extinct genus of teleosaurid crocodyliform from the Early Jurassic to Middle Jurassic (Toarcian to Callovian). Fossil specimens have been found in England, France, Germany, Switzerland and Morocco. The largest species, S. heberti, reached up to 5 m (16.5 ft) long, though 2.5–3.5 m was far more common Species in this genus are traditionally classed into two skull groups: longirostrine (long, narrow jaws) and brevirostrine (short, broad jaws)

ammonites (fossils) - loved collecting fossils like these as a child with my dad on family holidays by the sea

ammonites (fossils) - loved collecting fossils like these as a child with my dad on family holidays by the sea

Ammonites at the Smithsonian. Originating from within the bactritoid nautiloids, the ammonoid cephalopods first appeared in the Devonian (circa 400 million years ago) and became extinct at the close of the Cretaceous (65.5 Ma) along with the dinosaurs.

Ammonites at the Smithsonian. Originating from within the bactritoid nautiloids, the ammonoid cephalopods first appeared in the Devonian (circa 400 million years ago) and became extinct at the close of the Cretaceous (65.5 Ma) along with the dinosaurs.

Fish fossils buried suddenly and encapsulated in stone as evidence of this catastrophe.

Fish fossils buried suddenly and encapsulated in stone as evidence of this catastrophe.

Trilobite fossil. Over 17,000 known species roamed the oceans for over 270 million years. All gone now...

Trilobite fossil. Over 17,000 known species roamed the oceans for over 270 million years. All gone now...

Fossil Turtle. Undescribed member of the family  Baenidae, Early Eocene (50 million years).

Fossil Turtle. Undescribed member of the family Baenidae, Early Eocene (50 million years).

Yes, it's real!! A giant ammonite (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammonoidea) fossil.  Giant Ammonite Fossils

Giant Ammonite Fossils

Yes, it's real!! A giant ammonite (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammonoidea) fossil. Giant Ammonite Fossils

Identified as "Trilobite fossil ... Cambrian" Shape reminds me of a horseshoe crab

Identified as "Trilobite fossil ... Cambrian" Shape reminds me of a horseshoe crab

Have done fossil hunting (only where it's legal) in Montana, North Dakota and Washington. Fun for all ages.

Have done fossil hunting (only where it's legal) in Montana, North Dakota and Washington. Fun for all ages.

Over the years the kids have found a lot of fossils. I should find a nice way to display them.

Over the years the kids have found a lot of fossils. I should find a nice way to display them.

Google Image Result for http://www.prehistoricplanet.com/images/features/earth/geologictime/geologictime1.jpg

Google Image Result for http://www.prehistoricplanet.com/images/features/earth/geologictime/geologictime1.jpg

:^) Ammonite / This ammonite is on display in our Elements gallery. Herbert Art Gallery & Museum, Coventry, West Midlands, UK

:^) Ammonite / This ammonite is on display in our Elements gallery. Herbert Art Gallery & Museum, Coventry, West Midlands, UK

Dinosaur tail fossil | Archaeopteryx Fossil, most primitive bird known

Dinosaur tail fossil | Archaeopteryx Fossil, most primitive bird known

Kronosaurus fossil.  Can you even imagine what this looked like when it was swimming through the ocean?

Kronosaurus fossil. Can you even imagine what this looked like when it was swimming through the ocean?

Edmontosaurus is a genusof hadrosaurid (duck-billed) dinosaur. It contains two known species: Edmontosaurus regalis and Edmontosaurus annectens. Fossils of E. regalis have been found in rocks of western North America that date from the late Campanian stage of the Cretaceous Period 73 million years ago, while those of E. annectenswere found in the same geographic region but in rocks dated to the end of the Maastrichtian stage of the Cretaceous, 66 million years ago

Edmontosaurus is a genusof hadrosaurid (duck-billed) dinosaur. It contains two known species: Edmontosaurus regalis and Edmontosaurus annectens. Fossils of E. regalis have been found in rocks of western North America that date from the late Campanian stage of the Cretaceous Period 73 million years ago, while those of E. annectenswere found in the same geographic region but in rocks dated to the end of the Maastrichtian stage of the Cretaceous, 66 million years ago

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