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Before 1942, American children pledged allegiance to the flag with the Bellamy Salute so named after Francis Bellamy who wrote the pledge of allegiance in 1892. Worried that it might be confused with the Nazi's Roman salute, Congress changed the salute to simply placing a hand over the heart.

from Smithsonian

The Man Who Wrote the Pledge of Allegiance

Originally composed by Francis Bellamy in 1892 and formally adopted by Congress as the pledge in 1942


The Pledge of Allegiance was honored on this stamp in 1992, to celebrate its centennial.


Bring back to our schools everything that is in this picture. Children dressed properly, The Pledge of Allegiance, George Washington and Abraham Lincoln pictures on the wall.


Famous Freemasons: Bro. Francis Bellamy's original pledge~ "I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which is stands. One nation, indvivisble, with liberty and justice for all."


The pledge of our grandparents. "The original Bellamy salute, first described in 1892 by Francis Bellamy, who authored the original Pledge, began with a military salute, and after reciting the words "to the flag," the arm was extended toward the flag. In World War II, the salute too much resembled the Nazi salute, so it was changed to keep the right hand over the heart throughout."


Pledge of Allegiance First Published  On September 8, 1892, Francis Bellamy’s Pledge of Allegiance was published in The Youth’s Companion magazine to

from Smithsonian

How the Pledge of Allegiance Went From PR Gimmick to Patriotic Vow

Francis Bellamy had no idea how famous, and controversial, his quick ditty would become

Related Markers: Francis Bellamy Memorial Park Marcus Whitman Birthplace

The Pledge of Allegiance was written in August 1892 by Francis Bellamy, who was a Baptist minister. The original "Pledge of Allegiance" was published in the September 8 issue of the popular children's magazine The Youth's Companion as part of the National Public-School Celebration of Columbus Day, a celebration of the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus's arrival in the Americas. The Pledge was supposed to be quick and to the point. Bellamy designed it to be recited in 15 seconds.