Francis Walsingham - Wikipedia

Francis Walsingham - Wikipedia

Slap-soled shoes belonging to Frances Walsingham, lady in waiting to Elizabeth I, and daughter of her spymaster, Francis Walsingham.

Slap-soled shoes belonging to Frances Walsingham, lady in waiting to Elizabeth I, and daughter of her spymaster, Francis Walsingham.

Sir Francis Walsingham, Secretary of State and Spymaster to HM Elizabeth I  ~ by John De Critz the Elder

Sir Francis Walsingham, Secretary of State and Spymaster to HM Elizabeth I ~ by John De Critz the Elder

Tudor History.  The story of Queen Elizabeth I's "Spymaster" Sir Francis Walsingham

Tudor History. The story of Queen Elizabeth I's "Spymaster" Sir Francis Walsingham

Sir Francis Walsingham-Born: 1530, Scadbury Park, Chislehurst, Kent, England-Died: 6 Apr 1590, Seething Lane, London, Middlesex, England   Principal Secretary to Elizabeth I of England from 1573 until 1590, and is popularly remembered as her "spymaster". Elizabeth I. nicknamed him her 'Moor'.

Sir Francis Walsingham-Born: 1530, Scadbury Park, Chislehurst, Kent, England-Died: 6 Apr 1590, Seething Lane, London, Middlesex, England Principal Secretary to Elizabeth I of England from 1573 until 1590, and is popularly remembered as her "spymaster". Elizabeth I. nicknamed him her 'Moor'.

Portrait of "SIR FRANCIS WALSINGHAM" by Houbraken - Antique Print - 1738

Portrait of "SIR FRANCIS WALSINGHAM" by Houbraken - Antique Print - 1738

Sir Francis Walsingham, Elizabeth I's spymaster, who uncovered at least two plots against her life. Elizabeth called him her "moor" due to his swarthy complexion.

Sir Francis Walsingham, Elizabeth I's spymaster, who uncovered at least two plots against her life. Elizabeth called him her "moor" due to his swarthy complexion.

The smoking gun in the Babington Plot which sealed Mary, the so-called Queen of Scots' fate. Sir Francis Walsingham and his associates broke Mary Stuart's cipher without much difficulty.

The smoking gun in the Babington Plot which sealed Mary, the so-called Queen of Scots' fate. Sir Francis Walsingham and his associates broke Mary Stuart's cipher without much difficulty.

Cryptography in the 16th century. A nomenclator combines a substitution cipher with a small code set, as in the famous one shown in Figure 7-6. Mary Queen of Scots and her cohorts used this nomenclator during a plot against Queen Elizabeth I. Thomas Phelippes (cipher secretary to Sir Francis Walsingham, principal secretary to Elizabeth I) used frequency analysis to break it. Phelippes’ success cost Queen Mary her royal head.

Cryptography in the 16th century. A nomenclator combines a substitution cipher with a small code set, as in the famous one shown in Figure 7-6. Mary Queen of Scots and her cohorts used this nomenclator during a plot against Queen Elizabeth I. Thomas Phelippes (cipher secretary to Sir Francis Walsingham, principal secretary to Elizabeth I) used frequency analysis to break it. Phelippes’ success cost Queen Mary her royal head.

Signature Sir Francis Walsingham, Queen Elizabeth's Secretary of State and Spymaster www.drakesislandplymouth.co.uk

Signature Sir Francis Walsingham, Queen Elizabeth's Secretary of State and Spymaster www.drakesislandplymouth.co.uk

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