States of The <b>German</b> <b>Confederation</b> <b>Map</b> <b>1815</b>-1866 - VGS <b>German</b> SIG

States of The <b>German</b> <b>Confederation</b> <b>Map</b> <b>1815</b>-1866 - VGS <b>German</b> SIG

The North German Confederation was a federation of 22 independent states of northern Germany, with nearly 30 million inhabitants. It was the first modern German nation state and the basis for the later German Empire (1871–1918), when several south German states such as Bavaria joined. The North German Confederation is historically important for the economic and judicial unification of Germany; many of its laws were taken over by the German Empire.

The North German Confederation was a federation of 22 independent states of northern Germany, with nearly 30 million inhabitants. It was the first modern German nation state and the basis for the later German Empire (1871–1918), when several south German states such as Bavaria joined. The North German Confederation is historically important for the economic and judicial unification of Germany; many of its laws were taken over by the German Empire.

Liechtenstein used to be a part of the German Confederation until it's independence in 1866.  In 1868, after the German Confederation dissolved, Liechtenstein disbanded its army of 80 men and declared its permanent neutrality.

Liechtenstein used to be a part of the German Confederation until it's independence in 1866. In 1868, after the German Confederation dissolved, Liechtenstein disbanded its army of 80 men and declared its permanent neutrality.

The Congress of Vienna (1814-1815) greatly simplified the political division of Germany. The Holy Roman Empire of 1648 contained 234 territorial units, with 51 Free Cities, and multiple ecclesiastical states, like the great Archbishoprics of Salzburg, Magdeburg, and Trier and the Bishopric of Münster. Nevertheless, the 32 entities that remained after Vienna (with only 4 Free Cities and no ecclesiastical territories) were still a mess. The "German Confederation" established by the Congress.

The Congress of Vienna (1814-1815) greatly simplified the political division of Germany. The Holy Roman Empire of 1648 contained 234 territorial units, with 51 Free Cities, and multiple ecclesiastical states, like the great Archbishoprics of Salzburg, Magdeburg, and Trier and the Bishopric of Münster. Nevertheless, the 32 entities that remained after Vienna (with only 4 Free Cities and no ecclesiastical territories) were still a mess. The "German Confederation" established by the Congress.

Map of German unification - North German Confederation - German Empire 1871

Map of German unification - North German Confederation - German Empire 1871

Biedermeier - by the end of the Congress of Vienna in 1815 until the beginning of the bourgeois revolution in 1848 in the States of the German Confederation

Biedermeier - by the end of the Congress of Vienna in 1815 until the beginning of the bourgeois revolution in 1848 in the States of the German Confederation

German Confederation by FederalRepublic.deviantart.com on @DeviantArt

German Confederation by FederalRepublic.deviantart.com on @DeviantArt

Map of German unification - North German Confederation - German Empire 1871

Map of German unification - North German Confederation - German Empire 1871

In 963, Count Siegfried built a fortified castle on the Bock promontory, which was soon to become the cradle of the city. In the course of the centuries, on the western side, mighty ring walls were added, which, however, did not foil the Burgundians in their attempt to conquer the city in 1443. The best builder-engineers of the new masters (the Burgundians, the Spaniards, the French, the Austrians and the German Confederation) eventually turned the city into one of the most powerful…

In 963, Count Siegfried built a fortified castle on the Bock promontory, which was soon to become the cradle of the city. In the course of the centuries, on the western side, mighty ring walls were added, which, however, did not foil the Burgundians in their attempt to conquer the city in 1443. The best builder-engineers of the new masters (the Burgundians, the Spaniards, the French, the Austrians and the German Confederation) eventually turned the city into one of the most powerful…

https://flic.kr/p/RDC6A8 | Protector | Bismark Memorial Bismark Monument.  Otto von Bismark, Prussian Premier, Federal Chancelor Noth German Confederation,Reich Chancelor, the major Architect of the German Empire as the small Germany Solution and finnaly titular Saint of a delicious German Sushi (Bismark Herring, try it).  This Monument was sponsored by the People of Free and Hansatown of Hamburg as Bismark placed the Basement for further Profits by the very special "Free Port". This w

https://flic.kr/p/RDC6A8 | Protector | Bismark Memorial Bismark Monument. Otto von Bismark, Prussian Premier, Federal Chancelor Noth German Confederation,Reich Chancelor, the major Architect of the German Empire as the small Germany Solution and finnaly titular Saint of a delicious German Sushi (Bismark Herring, try it). This Monument was sponsored by the People of Free and Hansatown of Hamburg as Bismark placed the Basement for further Profits by the very special "Free Port". This w

Map of the German Confederation, 1815-1866

Map of the German Confederation, 1815-1866

JULY 19, 1870: FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR BEGINS  The war between the Second French Empire of Napoleon III and the states of the North German Confederation headed by the Kingdom of Prussia went on till May 10, 1871. It brought an end to French domination in continental Europe and resulted in the formation of a unified Germany.

JULY 19, 1870: FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR BEGINS The war between the Second French Empire of Napoleon III and the states of the North German Confederation headed by the Kingdom of Prussia went on till May 10, 1871. It brought an end to French domination in continental Europe and resulted in the formation of a unified Germany.

Pinterest
Search