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Mayall II (NGC 224-G1) is a globular cluster orbiting the Andromeda Galaxy. The cluster lies about 130,000 light years from M31’s core and is the brightest globular cluster in the Local Group of galaxies. It has an apparent magnitude of 13.7.

Mayall II (NGC 224-G1) is a globular cluster orbiting the Andromeda Galaxy. The cluster lies about 130,000 light years from M31’s core and is the brightest globular cluster in the Local Group of galaxies. It has an apparent magnitude of 13.7.

The Kavli Foundation Q&A: Do Globular Clusters Generate Black Holes? [VIDEO] — #Astronomy via #SkyandTelescope

The Kavli Foundation Q&A: Do Globular Clusters Generate Black Holes? [VIDEO] — #Astronomy via #SkyandTelescope

An artist's conception of black holes feeding on matter from companion stars and sending out bright jets into the space within a globular cluster.

An artist's conception of black holes feeding on matter from companion stars and sending out bright jets into the space within a globular cluster.

n-a-s-a: “  A map of our galaxy the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars ”

n-a-s-a: “ A map of our galaxy the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars ”

The Great Globular Cluster in Hercules - In 1716, English astronomer Edmond Halleynoted,  "This is but a little Patch, but it shews itself to the naked Eye, when the Sky is serene and the Moon absent." Of course, M13 is now less modestly recognized as the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules, one of the brightest globular star clusters in the northern sky. Telescopic views reveal the spectacular cluster's hundreds of thousands of stars

The Great Globular Cluster in Hercules - In 1716, English astronomer Edmond Halleynoted, "This is but a little Patch, but it shews itself to the naked Eye, when the Sky is serene and the Moon absent." Of course, M13 is now less modestly recognized as the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules, one of the brightest globular star clusters in the northern sky. Telescopic views reveal the spectacular cluster's hundreds of thousands of stars

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observes the center of the globular cluster Messier 22, also known as M22.

Hubble Stares into the Crammed Center of Messier 22

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observes the center of the globular cluster Messier 22, also known as M22.

Globular Cluster NGC 6535  - PopularMechanics.com

These 20 New Space Photos Are Awe-Inspring

In 1974, an interstellar radio message containing encoded information about the human race, DNA, atomic numbers, Earth’s position and other information, was beamed from the Arecibo Observatory radio telescope towards globular cluster M13 and its 300,000 stars as an experiment in contacting potential extraterrestrial civilizations. Traveling at the speed of light, it will take 25,000 years to arrive.

In 1974, an interstellar radio message containing encoded information about the human race, DNA, atomic numbers, Earth’s position and other information, was beamed from the Arecibo Observatory radio telescope towards globular cluster M13 and its 300,000 stars as an experiment in contacting potential extraterrestrial civilizations. Traveling at the speed of light, it will take 25,000 years to arrive.

In this image, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the brilliance of the compact center of Messier 70, a globular cluster. Quarters are always tight in globular clusters, where the mutual hold of gravity binds together hundreds of thousands of stars in a small region of space. Having this many shining stars piled on top of one another from our perspective makes globular clusters a popular target for amateur skywatchers and scientists alike.

In this image, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the brilliance of the compact center of Messier 70, a globular cluster. Quarters are always tight in globular clusters, where the mutual hold of gravity binds together hundreds of thousands of stars in a small region of space. Having this many shining stars piled on top of one another from our perspective makes globular clusters a popular target for amateur skywatchers and scientists alike.

There is nothing to learn... some of us know that... Yes. In us... all the knowledge is available... Everything that has ever happened is present in this moment through vibration... or Frequencies... There is no past... no future... only this present moment... In this moment I can reach in... or out... and connect to all that is.

There is nothing to learn... some of us know that... Yes. In us... all the knowledge is available... Everything that has ever happened is present in this moment through vibration... or Frequencies... There is no past... no future... only this present moment... In this moment I can reach in... or out... and connect to all that is.

Globular Cluster NGC 6397 Credit: NASA, ESA and H. Richer (University of British Columbia)(via imgTumble)

Globular Cluster NGC 6397 Credit: NASA, ESA and H. Richer (University of British Columbia)(via imgTumble)

Globular Cluster M53 (NGC5024) - Star Clusters - Digital Images of the Sky

Globular Cluster M53 (NGC5024) - Star Clusters - Digital Images of the Sky

Capturing Beauty in Infinite Space, The Most Stunning Astronomy Photos of 2013 (Photo Gallery)

Capturing Beauty in Infinite Space, The Most Stunning Astronomy Photos of 2013 (Photo Gallery)

The Hubble Telescope Photographs Messier One of the Densest Clusters of Stars Ever Discovered stars space NASA "Concepts, Articles" December 2013 Colossal Art and Visual Culture 2013

A map of the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_Way

A map of the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_Way

Globular clusters once ruled the Milky Way. Back in the old days, back when our Galaxy first formed, perhaps thousands of globular clusters roamed our Galaxy. Today, there are perhaps 200 left. Many globular clusters were destroyed over the eons by repeated fateful encounters with each other or the Galactic center. Surviving relics are older than any Earth fossil, older than any other structures in our Galaxy, and limit the universe itself in raw age. There are few, if any, young globular…

Globular clusters once ruled the Milky Way. Back in the old days, back when our Galaxy first formed, perhaps thousands of globular clusters roamed our Galaxy. Today, there are perhaps 200 left. Many globular clusters were destroyed over the eons by repeated fateful encounters with each other or the Galactic center. Surviving relics are older than any Earth fossil, older than any other structures in our Galaxy, and limit the universe itself in raw age. There are few, if any, young globular…