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Extinct: Great Auk: These auks were flightless penguins from the Atlantic. They were one of the largest auks standing about 30-34 inches high. They had white and glossy black feathers, and were once seen in huge numbers in the northern frigid areas. Records show that they were hunted to extinction in these places.

Extinct: Great Auk: These auks were flightless penguins from the Atlantic. They were one of the largest auks standing about 30-34 inches high. They had white and glossy black feathers, and were once seen in huge numbers in the northern frigid areas. Records show that they were hunted to extinction in these places.

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The Irish name for the great auk is 'falcóg mhór'. The Basque name is arponaz, meaning "spearbill". Its early French name was apponatz. The Norse called the great auk geirfugl, which led to an alternative English common name for the bird, "garefowl"/ "gairfowl". The Inuit name for the great auk was isarukitsok. The word "penguin" first appears in the 16th century as a synonym for "great auk." It may be derived from the Welsh pen gwyn "white head", although the etymology is debated.

The Irish name for the great auk is 'falcóg mhór'. The Basque name is arponaz, meaning "spearbill". Its early French name was apponatz. The Norse called the great auk geirfugl, which led to an alternative English common name for the bird, "garefowl"/ "gairfowl". The Inuit name for the great auk was isarukitsok. The word "penguin" first appears in the 16th century as a synonym for "great auk." It may be derived from the Welsh pen gwyn "white head", although the etymology is debated.

EXTINCT:Great Auk  Pinguinus impennis A flightless, penguin-like bird that was clumsy on land but swift in water. It lived in vast colonies on the Atlantic shores and islands of the US and Canada, Scandinavia and even Britain.  What happened? It was ruthlessly hunted by sailors and colonists for its down, eggs and flesh. Despite formal protection by the British in 1755, only a few were left at the start of the 19th century. By then, they were in great demand by collectors and institution...

EXTINCT:Great Auk Pinguinus impennis A flightless, penguin-like bird that was clumsy on land but swift in water. It lived in vast colonies on the Atlantic shores and islands of the US and Canada, Scandinavia and even Britain. What happened? It was ruthlessly hunted by sailors and colonists for its down, eggs and flesh. Despite formal protection by the British in 1755, only a few were left at the start of the 19th century. By then, they were in great demand by collectors and institution...

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July 3, 1844: Last pair of Great Auks killed. Although individual auks were seen after that, there were no more breeding pairs left, and the birds became extinct. They had been hunted by humans for over 100,000 years, but it wasn't until Europeans developed a taste for auk down comforters that the creature was really in trouble. This painting by John James Audubon shows the Great Auk in its summer plumage.

July 3, 1844: Last pair of Great Auks killed. Although individual auks were seen after that, there were no more breeding pairs left, and the birds became extinct. They had been hunted by humans for over 100,000 years, but it wasn't until Europeans developed a taste for auk down comforters that the creature was really in trouble. This painting by John James Audubon shows the Great Auk in its summer plumage.

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Mike Trutwin's beautiful Great Auk - (Nick Schade design) awesome!
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The Great Auk (Pinguinus impennis) was a large, flightless bird that became extinct in the mid-19th century. It was the only modern species in the genus Pinguinus, a group of birds that formerly included one other species of flightless giant auk from the Atlantic Ocean region.  The Little Ice Age may have reduced the population of the Great Auk by exposing more of their breeding islands to predation by Polar Bears, but massive exploitation for their down drastically reduced the population.

The Great Auk (Pinguinus impennis) was a large, flightless bird that became extinct in the mid-19th century. It was the only modern species in the genus Pinguinus, a group of birds that formerly included one other species of flightless giant auk from the Atlantic Ocean region. The Little Ice Age may have reduced the population of the Great Auk by exposing more of their breeding islands to predation by Polar Bears, but massive exploitation for their down drastically reduced the population.

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Holocene Extinction Month #08 – Great Auk The great auk (Pinguinus impennis) was an 85 cm tall (33.5in) flightless alcid seabird. Although very penguin-like in form, this is purely due to convergent evolution – its closest living relative is the flighted razorbill. Originally found in cold coastal waters around the North Atlantic, it only ventured onto land to breed once a year. It was hunted by humans for its feathers, eggs, meat, fat, and oil, and nearly all of the nesting colonies on…

Holocene Extinction Month #08 – Great Auk The great auk (Pinguinus impennis) was an 85 cm tall (33.5in) flightless alcid seabird. Although very penguin-like in form, this is purely due to convergent evolution – its closest living relative is the flighted razorbill. Originally found in cold coastal waters around the North Atlantic, it only ventured onto land to breed once a year. It was hunted by humans for its feathers, eggs, meat, fat, and oil, and nearly all of the nesting colonies on…

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The Great Auk (Pinguinus impennis) was a large, flightless bird of the alcid family that became extinct in the mid-19th century. It was the only modern species in the genus Pinguinus, a group of birds that formerly included one other species of flightless giant auk from the Atlantic Ocean region.

The Great Auk (Pinguinus impennis) was a large, flightless bird of the alcid family that became extinct in the mid-19th century. It was the only modern species in the genus Pinguinus, a group of birds that formerly included one other species of flightless giant auk from the Atlantic Ocean region.

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The great-auk - As the great auk died out in Newfoundland, its European population also declined. Its range was an arc across the North Atlantic from Canada to Greenland and Iceland, and across to Britain. Its bones have also been found in Florida (bones were 3250 years old), New England, Labrador and coastal areas of Norway, Denmark, the Netherlands, Brittany, the Bristol Channel and even Gibraltar. Read more at http://messybeast.com/extinct/great-auk.htm

The great-auk - As the great auk died out in Newfoundland, its European population also declined. Its range was an arc across the North Atlantic from Canada to Greenland and Iceland, and across to Britain. Its bones have also been found in Florida (bones were 3250 years old), New England, Labrador and coastal areas of Norway, Denmark, the Netherlands, Brittany, the Bristol Channel and even Gibraltar. Read more at http://messybeast.com/extinct/great-auk.htm