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✯ Cell infected with HIV. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of HIV particles (red/orange) budding from the membrane of a host cell. HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) attacks CD4+ T-lymphocytes (specialised white blood cells), which are crucial in the body's immune system. It enters the cell and makes many copies of itself, which then destroy the cell as they emerge through its membrane. This severely weakens the immune system, causing AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome).✯

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You might have HIV without knowing it; here are the 3 signs This human T cell (in blue) is under attack by HIV (in yellow), the virus that causes AIDS. The virus specifically targets T cells, which play a critical role in the body’s immune response against invaders like bacteria and viruses. eth Pincus, Elizabeth Fischer and Austin Athman, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

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First the virus makes its way into a cell using its virulence factors. After that the virus enzymes converts RNA to DNA. Then the virus replicates using transcription. Virus proteins and rNA copies are then put together to make new virus particles. Once the particles are released, they then go on to infect the humans t-cells causing the disease.

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You might have HIV without knowing it; here are the 3 signs HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus):lentovirus (slowly-replicating retrovirus); has RNA as genetic material and synthesizes DNA, using reverse transcriptase to incorporate its genetic material into hosts genome; causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); may be spread by contact with body fluids, including blood/semen; binds to CD4 receptors on the surface of target cells within its host; uses host cells own enzymatic ma...

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HIV/AIDS: How HIV spreads and evades the immune system, Pathogenesis and Differences between HIV 1 and HIV 2 |The Health and Disease Blog

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The Rise of Chronic Conditions Unlike many ailments, chronic illnesses can be controlled but not cured. Check out this #infographic from the University of Arizona's College of Nursing for information on the prevalence of just three of many chronic illnesses.

The Rise of Chronic Conditions Unlike many ailments, chronic illnesses can be controlled but not cured. Check out this #infographic from the University of Arizona's College of Nursing for information on the prevalence of just three of many chronic illnesses.

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