Homo heidelbergensis (700,000 to 200,000 years ago.) by Sam_Wise, via Flickr. Photo of a bust in the National Museum of Natural History; Washington, D.C.. first discovered in 1908, near Heidelberg, Germany.

Homo heidelbergensis (700,000 to 200,000 years ago.) by Sam_Wise, via Flickr. Photo of a bust in the National Museum of Natural History; Washington, D.C.. first discovered in 1908, near Heidelberg, Germany.

Image of male reconstruction based on Kabwe by John Gurche (Homo heidelbergensis).

Image of male reconstruction based on Kabwe by John Gurche (Homo heidelbergensis).

So far we have unearthed fossil evidence from more than 20 different human-like species, known as hominins, who are more closely related to humans than any of the apes alive today.     Meet some of our oldest relatives below and discover what insights they can provide about our own evolution.

So far we have unearthed fossil evidence from more than 20 different human-like species, known as hominins, who are more closely related to humans than any of the apes alive today. Meet some of our oldest relatives below and discover what insights they can provide about our own evolution.

Homo heidelbergensis, artists rendering of an ancestors face, drawing

Homo heidelbergensis, artists rendering of an ancestors face, drawing

Homo heidelbergensis ("Heidelberg Man", named after the University of Heidelberg) is an extinct species of the genus Homo which may be the direct ancestor of both Homo neanderthalensis in Europe and Homo sapiens. The best evidence found for these hominins dates them between 600,000 and 400,000 years ago. H. heidelbergensis stone tool technology was very close to that of the Acheulean tools used by Homo erectus.

Homo heidelbergensis ("Heidelberg Man", named after the University of Heidelberg) is an extinct species of the genus Homo which may be the direct ancestor of both Homo neanderthalensis in Europe and Homo sapiens. The best evidence found for these hominins dates them between 600,000 and 400,000 years ago. H. heidelbergensis stone tool technology was very close to that of the Acheulean tools used by Homo erectus.

Homo Heidelbergensis | Reconstrucción de Homo Heidelbergensis - Kennis & Kennis ...

Homo Heidelbergensis | Reconstrucción de Homo Heidelbergensis - Kennis & Kennis ...

‘Kabwe’ or ‘Broken Hill 1’ Homo heidelbergensis skull. Bigfoot?  Bones will not fossilize in heavily forested areas. Land bridge movement into NA is possible.

‘Kabwe’ or ‘Broken Hill 1’ Homo heidelbergensis skull. Bigfoot? Bones will not fossilize in heavily forested areas. Land bridge movement into NA is possible.

HOMO HEIDELBERGENSIS: Surgió hace más de 500,000 años y perduró al menos hasta hace 250,000 años en Europa y África. Eran individuos altos y muy fuertes, de grandes cráneos (1.350 cm³) y muy aplanados con relación a los del hombre actual, con mandíbulas salientes. Es un antepasado directo del Hombre de Neandertal en Europa; no fueron antepasados directos de los Homo sapiens modernos.

HOMO HEIDELBERGENSIS: Surgió hace más de 500,000 años y perduró al menos hasta hace 250,000 años en Europa y África. Eran individuos altos y muy fuertes, de grandes cráneos (1.350 cm³) y muy aplanados con relación a los del hombre actual, con mandíbulas salientes. Es un antepasado directo del Hombre de Neandertal en Europa; no fueron antepasados directos de los Homo sapiens modernos.

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