A normal adult human skeleton consists of 206 named bones (or 213 if each of the nine fused vertebrae of the sacrum and coccyx are counted as independent bones). The individual bones of the skeleton are connected by three types of joints, which differ in the type and amount of movement they allow. The human skeleton is divided functionally into an axial skeleton that supports the main body axis and an appendicular skeleton that supports the arms and legs.

A normal adult human skeleton consists of 206 named bones (or 213 if each of the nine fused vertebrae of the sacrum and coccyx are counted as independent bones). The individual bones of the skeleton are connected by three types of joints, which differ in the type and amount of movement they allow. The human skeleton is divided functionally into an axial skeleton that supports the main body axis and an appendicular skeleton that supports the arms and legs.

Print Quality Human Skeleton. Click to website for 1356x4500 pixel image.

Print Quality Human Skeleton. Click to website for 1356x4500 pixel image.

Posture Quiz Time:     What are the "common" names for the following bones of the body?    A. Tibia  B. Humerus  C. Clavicle  D. Patella  E. Vertebrae    https://www.facebook.com/PainFreePostureMN

Posture Quiz Time: What are the "common" names for the following bones of the body? A. Tibia B. Humerus C. Clavicle D. Patella E. Vertebrae https://www.facebook.com/PainFreePostureMN

... , working from observation of the skeleton image, superimpose a drawing of a skeleton onto each figure, paying attention to accuracy of proportions and foreshortening.

... , working from observation of the skeleton image, superimpose a drawing of a skeleton onto each figure, paying attention to accuracy of proportions and foreshortening.

Skeleton Antique Book Plate - Medical Ephemera - Human Anatomy

Skeleton Antique Book Plate - Medical Ephemera - Human Anatomy

Plate I. From 'A System of Anatomical Plates of the Human Body' by John Lizars, published in Edinburgh, 1822 (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/287386019949067683).

Plate I. From 'A System of Anatomical Plates of the Human Body' by John Lizars, published in Edinburgh, 1822 (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/287386019949067683).

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