Every Organ Tells a Story 3 - A History of Anatomical Terms

Every Organ Tells a Story 3: A History of Anatomical Terms

Cochlea of Inner ear watercolor print anatomy art by MimiPrints

Cochlea of Inner ear watercolor print anatomy art vestibular system inner ear structure cochlea poster cochlea print audiology poster

Diagnosis of ENT Disorders: <a href="http://adam.about.net/encyclopedia/Ear-anatomy.htm">Outer & Inner Ear</a>

The Different Ways ENT Disorders Are Diagnosed

Diagnosis of ENT Disorders: <a href="http://adam.about.net/encyclopedia/Ear-anatomy.htm">Outer & Inner Ear</a>

A Photographic Tour of the Cochlea. The Inner Ear photo courtesy of Helge Rask-Andersen, MD, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden

A Photographic Tour of the Cochlea. The Inner Ear photo courtesy of Helge Rask-Andersen, MD, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden

Inner ear hair cells. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of sensory hair cells in the cochlea of the inner ear. The crescent-shaped arrangements of hairs across top are the stereocilia. Each crescent lies atop a single cell. Magnification: x1000 when printed at 10 centimetres wide.

Inner ear hair cells. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of sensory hair cells in the cochlea of the inner ear. The crescent-shaped arrangements of hairs across top are the stereocilia. Each crescent lies atop a single cell. Magnification: x1000 when printed at 10 centimetres wide.

Inner ear hair cells, Scanning Electron Microscope. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of sensory hair cells from the inner ear. These cells are surrounded by a fluid called endolymph. As sound enters the ear it causes waves to form in the endolymph, which in turn cause the hairs to move. The movement is converted to an electrical signal that is passed on to the brain. Each crescent-shaped arrangement of hairs lies atop a single cell.

Inner ear hair cells, Scanning Electron Microscope. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of sensory hair cells from the inner ear. These cells are surrounded by a fluid called endolymph. As sound enters the ear it causes waves to form in the endolymph, which in turn cause the hairs to move. The movement is converted to an electrical signal that is passed on to the brain. Each crescent-shaped arrangement of hairs lies atop a single cell.

Pinterest
Search