Tengu- Japanese folklore: an avian creature with human characteristics. They were thought of as evil malignant spirits or protective guardians.

Tengu- Japanese folklore: an avian creature with human characteristics. They were thought of as evil malignant spirits or protective guardians.

Rokurokubi are demons found in Japanese folklore. They look like normal human beings by day, but at night they gain the ability to stretch their necks to great lengths. They can also change their faces to those of terrifying oni to better scare mortals.  In their daytime human forms, rokurokubi often live undetected and may even take mortal spouses. Many rokurokubi become so accustomed to such a life that they take great pains to keep their demonic forms secret.

Rokurokubi are demons found in Japanese folklore. They look like normal human beings by day, but at night they gain the ability to stretch their necks to great lengths. They can also change their faces to those of terrifying oni to better scare mortals. In their daytime human forms, rokurokubi often live undetected and may even take mortal spouses. Many rokurokubi become so accustomed to such a life that they take great pains to keep their demonic forms secret.

Katsushika Hokusai - The Ghost of Oiwa (Oiwa-san), from the series One Hundred Ghost Stories (Hyaku monogatari) 1832

Katsushika Hokusai - The Ghost of Oiwa (Oiwa-san), from the series One Hundred Ghost Stories (Hyaku monogatari) 1832

Sara-hebi (さら蛇) is a large, snake-like creature with the head of a woman. Yokai Ghost stories from Japanese folklore.

Sara-hebi (さら蛇) is a large, snake-like creature with the head of a woman. Yokai Ghost stories from Japanese folklore.

Kitsune (狐 or きつね, Kitsune) is the Japanese word for fox. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore; in English, kitsune refers to them in this context. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom. According to Yōkai folklore, all foxes have the ability to shape shift into men or women. While some folktales speak of kitsune employing this ability to trick others—as foxes in folklore often do—other stories…

Kitsune (狐 or きつね, Kitsune) is the Japanese word for fox. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore; in English, kitsune refers to them in this context. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom. According to Yōkai folklore, all foxes have the ability to shape shift into men or women. While some folktales speak of kitsune employing this ability to trick others—as foxes in folklore often do—other stories…

According to Japanese folklore, a cat (neko) that has lived for a long time can become a kind of youkai called a nekomata (猫叉). It was believed that after a cat reached ten years of age, its tail would slowly split into two tails, and, along the way, it would develop magic powers, primarily those of necromancy and shamanism. Nekomata also have an ability to shape shift into a human form and are generally hostile to humans.  There is also one kind of Nekomata that lived in Nabes

According to Japanese folklore, a cat (neko) that has lived for a long time can become a kind of youkai called a nekomata (猫叉). It was believed that after a cat reached ten years of age, its tail would slowly split into two tails, and, along the way, it would develop magic powers, primarily those of necromancy and shamanism. Nekomata also have an ability to shape shift into a human form and are generally hostile to humans. There is also one kind of Nekomata that lived in Nabes

Filler? The sparkly looking stuff Moon: In Japanese folklore, the rabbit (usagi) resides on the

Filler? The sparkly looking stuff Moon: In Japanese folklore, the rabbit (usagi) resides on the

Kuchisake-Onna (The Slit Mouthed Woman) - Japanese folklore: She was once the very beautiful wife or concubine of a samurai. In a jealous rage, he mutilated her face. Her ghost returned, covering part of her face with a kimono sleeve, asking wanderers "Do you think I'm beautiful?"  She would reveal her face with a 'yes' and ask "Do you think I'm Beautiful now?"  Various bad things happen with just about any answer. Her modern form seems to wear a 'cold mask'; modern sightings have caused…

Kuchisake-Onna (The Slit Mouthed Woman) - Japanese folklore: She was once the very beautiful wife or concubine of a samurai. In a jealous rage, he mutilated her face. Her ghost returned, covering part of her face with a kimono sleeve, asking wanderers "Do you think I'm beautiful?" She would reveal her face with a 'yes' and ask "Do you think I'm Beautiful now?" Various bad things happen with just about any answer. Her modern form seems to wear a 'cold mask'; modern sightings have caused…

Keukegen- Japanese folklore: a creature covered in black fur that lives in peoples houses. Its name means "rarely seen". It was a disease spirit, inflicting sickness into those who lived in its host house.

Keukegen- Japanese folklore: a creature covered in black fur that lives in peoples houses. Its name means "rarely seen". It was a disease spirit, inflicting sickness into those who lived in its host house.

Mujina- Japanese folklore: magical badgers that live in the mountains. They can shapeshift into human form, but can also take the appearance of a noppera-bo; a faceless human. They are very shy and tend to avoid humans as much as possible.

Mujina- Japanese folklore: magical badgers that live in the mountains. They can shapeshift into human form, but can also take the appearance of a noppera-bo; a faceless human. They are very shy and tend to avoid humans as much as possible.

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