Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas
Warning: Do NOT read these 17 Japanese urban legends before bed. They will scare the shit out of you. Trust me...

Warning: Do NOT Read These 17 Japanese Urban Legends Before Bed. Trust me...

Warning: Do NOT read these 17 Japanese urban legends before bed. They will scare the shit out of you. Trust me...

pin 365
heart 211
speech 20
Say goodbye to sleep, here are 10 horrifying Japanese urban legends

Say goodbye to sleep, here are 10 horrifying Japanese urban legends

pin 151
heart 93
speech 5

Baku: The Legend of the Dream Eater: The baku, otherwise known as the ‘dream eater’, is a mythological being or spirit in Chinese and Japanese folklore which is said to devour nightmares. The baku cannot be summoned without caution, however, as ancient legends say that if the baku is not satisfied after consuming the nightmare, he may also devour one’s hopes and dreams.

pin 699
heart 104

A Japanese legend says that if you can’t sleep at night it’s because you’re awake in someone else’s dream.

pin 29
heart 5
speech 1

Keukegen- Japanese folklore: a creature covered in black fur that lives in peoples houses. Its name means "rarely seen". It was a disease spirit, inflicting sickness into those who lived in its host house.

pin 291
heart 63

Amaterasu (天照?) is a part of the Japanese myth cycle and also a major deity of the Shinto religion. She is the goddess of the sun, but also of the universe. The name Amaterasu derived from Amateru meaning "shining in heaven." The meaning of her whole name, Amaterasu-ōmikami, is "the great august kami (god) who shines in the heaven".[1] The Emperor of Japan is said to be a direct descendant of Amaterasu.

pin 178
heart 55

♡ The Legend of the Tanabata ♡ Story here: www.facebook.com/JapanLoverMe Sharing the Worldwide JapanLove ♥ www.japanlover.me ♥ www.instagram.com/JapanLoverMe Art by Little Miss Paintbrush ♥

pin 94
heart 29

Hi everyone! It's Japanese spooky urban legends time! (⊙ヮ⊙) ๑ Kuchisake-onna (The Slit-Mouthed Woman) ๑

pin 44
heart 15
speech 1

baku: Chinese and Japanese Folklore Morphology: A furry creature with elephantine tusks and trunk. The fur is often striped like a tiger or zebra. Many believe early sightings of tapirs inspired this creature.

pin 998
heart 169
speech 1

The Tale of the Peony Lantern | Botan Dōrō Story here: www.facebook.com/JapanLoverMe Sharing the Worldwide JapanLove ♥ www.japanlover.me ♥ www.instagram.com/JapanLoverMe Trivia: Hone-onna are creatures in Japanese folklore that are actually made up of bones, but disguises themselves as beautiful women. They attract men to make love to them, but only draining out their victim's health and life force until he becomes a skeleton himself. ( ꒪Д꒪)ノ Art by Little Miss Paintbrush

pin 19
heart 9

Kichijoten, Japanese Goddess of happiness and prosperity. In Japan, Kichijōten is a Japanese divinity. Adapted from the Hindu goddess Lakshmi, the wife of Vishnu, she is sometimes named as one of the Seven Gods of Fortune especially associated with New Year. She is considered to be the goddess of happiness, fertility and beauty. She is also associated with harvest and fortune

pin 266
heart 50

Sara-hebi (さら蛇) is a large, snake-like creature with the head of a woman. Yokai Ghost stories from Japanese folklore.

pin 431
heart 91

Rokurokubi is a type of Japanese yōkai that has two types: one whose head can detach from the body, and one whose neck can elongate. The type whose head can detach is called nukekubi. Sharing the Worldwide JapanLove ♥ www.japanlover.me ♥ www.instagram.com/JapanLoverMe http://japanlover.me/cool/ Art by Little Miss Paintbrush

pin 208
heart 72

Bertha Lum was one of the Japanizing artists who helped making the art of (Japanese and Chinese) wood block printing known outside Asia, mixing it with the elegant Art Nouveau. Her prints are inspired by old legends and the street life of Beijing.

pin 310
heart 42

Amaterasu [天照], Amaterasu-ōmikami or Ōhirume-no-muchi-no-kami is a part of the Japanese myth cycle and also a major deity of the Shinto religion. She is the goddess of the sun, but also of the universe. In Japanese mythology, Amaterasu, the goddess of th

pin 590
heart 184

Yūrei (Japanese folklore): Used as a general term; there are also more specific types of ghosts, like the Onryō (vengeful spirits who return from purgatory), Goryō (aristocratic ghosts, often vengeful martyrs), or Zashiki-warashi (mischievous ghost children).

pin 147
heart 24

"百鬼夜行と魑魅魍魎 / Hyakkiyagyo Chimimoryo / Demon spirits of the mountains and rivers" book cover

pin 18
heart 5

Tsukuyomi or Tsukiyomi [月読], also known as Tsukiyomi-no-mikoto, is the moon god in Shinto and Japanese mythology. Tsukuyomi was the second of the “three noble children” born when Izanagi-no-Mikoto, the god who created the first land of Onogoro-shima, was cleansing himself of his sins while bathing after escaping the underworld and the clutches of his enraged dead wife, Izanami-no-Mikoto. Tsukuyomi was born when he washed out of Izanagi’s right eye.

pin 264
heart 76

The Japanese legend of Ubume: The Ubume is a ghost of a woman who died in childbirth. She usually asks a passerby to hold her child for a moment, then she disappears when her victim takes the swaddled baby. The baby then becomes heavier, until it's impossible to hold. It's then revealed to actually be a boulder or large stone.

pin 34
heart 3

Tenjō-kudari (天井下), its name means “coming down from the ceiling,” and that is pretty much the long and short of what this yokai does.

pin 272
heart 59