John Snow's famous Cholera Map from 1854, updated to show off CartoDB's cloud based mapping tool.

John Snow's famous Cholera Map from 1854, updated to show off CartoDB's cloud based mapping tool.

The Ghost Map (a little public health and history mixed together)

The Ghost Map: Hard Lessons in Epidemiology from Victorian London

The Ghost Map (a little public health and history mixed together)

Original map made by John Snow in 1854. Cholera cases are highlighted in black.

Original map made by John Snow in 1854. Cholera cases are highlighted in black.

John Snow was one of the first epidemiologists in the 1800s. He mapped out the cases of the cholera outbreak in London to find the cause and recurrence by investigating the people infected.

John Snow was one of the first epidemiologists in the 1800s. He mapped out the cases of the cholera outbreak in London to find the cause and recurrence by investigating the people infected.

Documents that Changed the World podcasts: John Snow’s cholera map, 1854 | UW Today

Documents that Changed the World podcasts: John Snow’s cholera map, 1854 | UW Today

John Snow cholera maps: “These simple maps proved that an outbreak of cholera could be traced to a specific water pump” #ilovemaps

John Snow cholera maps: “These simple maps proved that an outbreak of cholera could be traced to a specific water pump” #ilovemaps

Objective Maps? A Study of Variations on John Snow's Cholera Map | Southwestern GIS

Objective Maps? A Study of Variations on John Snow's Cholera Map | Southwestern GIS

The most famous map of cholera is that of John Snow (LL).  There is nothing very special about this map, except that it helped display how people caught cholera.  Another map then published detailed a similar relationship and added time and sequence to the scenario.  Still, the best map was that of John Lea (center).  Snow refuted it.  But 25 years later we would learn that Lea was right.

The most famous map of cholera is that of John Snow (LL). There is nothing very special about this map, except that it helped display how people caught cholera. Another map then published detailed a similar relationship and added time and sequence to the scenario. Still, the best map was that of John Lea (center). Snow refuted it. But 25 years later we would learn that Lea was right.

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