Our Planets Clip Art Collection is a set of royalty free vector graphics that includes a personal and commercial use license.

Our Planets Clip Art Collection is a set of royalty free vector graphics that includes a personal and commercial use license.

The four largest and best known of Jupiter's 60+ moons. I can see these through my telescope!!! ❤️

The four largest and best known of Jupiter's 60+ moons. I can see these through my telescope!!! ❤️

A cylindrical projection of Jupiter stitched together from photos taken by the Cassini spacecraft during its December 2000 flyby of the planet.

A cylindrical projection of Jupiter stitched together from photos taken by the Cassini spacecraft during its December 2000 flyby of the planet.

Like the sun, Jupiter is composed predominantly of hydrogen & helium. But unlike the sun, it lacks the necessary amount to begin fusion, the process that fuels a star. Jupiter would need to be 75-80 times more massive than it is at present to be considered a star. If all of the planets in the solar system had formed as part of the gas giant, it still would not have sufficient mass. Still, by itself, Jupiter is 2 & 1/2 times larger than all of the other planets in the solar system combined.

Like the sun, Jupiter is composed predominantly of hydrogen & helium. But unlike the sun, it lacks the necessary amount to begin fusion, the process that fuels a star. Jupiter would need to be 75-80 times more massive than it is at present to be considered a star. If all of the planets in the solar system had formed as part of the gas giant, it still would not have sufficient mass. Still, by itself, Jupiter is 2 & 1/2 times larger than all of the other planets in the solar system combined.

A Hitchhiker's Guide to Space & Plasma Physics - Planets of Our Solar System Our solar system...

A Hitchhiker's Guide to Space & Plasma Physics - Planets of Our Solar System Our solar system...

Jupiter's Great Red Spot, which extends from the equator to the southern polar latitudes, as seen by the space probe Voyager 2 in 1979

Jupiter's Great Red Spot, which extends from the equator to the southern polar latitudes, as seen by the space probe Voyager 2 in 1979

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