Barry Hines' 1968 novel "A Kestrel for a Knave" was about a mistreated and deprived 15 year old lad training and caring for a fledgling kestrel. Ken Loach's low-budget feature film adaptation the following year was titled simply "Kes" and starred a young David (Dai) Bradley with Colin Welland and Brian Glover.

Barry Hines' 1968 novel "A Kestrel for a Knave" was about a mistreated and deprived 15 year old lad training and caring for a fledgling kestrel. Ken Loach's low-budget feature film adaptation the following year was titled simply "Kes" and starred a young David (Dai) Bradley with Colin Welland and Brian Glover.

ABOUT THE ART Kes is a 1969 drama film directed by Ken Loach and produced by Tony Garnett. The film is based on the 1968 novel A Kestrel for a Knave, written by the Barnsley-born author Barry Hines. Both the film and the book provide a portrait of life in the mining areas of Yorkshire of the time. The school used as the main set was St. Helens School, Athersley South.   kes, film, kestrel, boy, barnsley, south yorkshire, iconic, child, growing up, falconry, offensive gesture, athersley…

Kes Billy Art Print

ABOUT THE ART Kes is a 1969 drama film directed by Ken Loach and produced by Tony Garnett. The film is based on the 1968 novel A Kestrel for a Knave, written by the Barnsley-born author Barry Hines. Both the film and the book provide a portrait of life in the mining areas of Yorkshire of the time. The school used as the main set was St. Helens School, Athersley South. kes, film, kestrel, boy, barnsley, south yorkshire, iconic, child, growing up, falconry, offensive gesture, athersley…

SERIE MODE : KES   Photos : Ross Bolger  Style : Jo McGuinness

Série mode : Kes

"None of us had kestrels, but we all related to the film. Most fictional kids we'd seen on the telly were posh and public-school, like Tom Brown. But Kes wasn't about privilege – just the opposite. Working-class boys speaking in working-class accents, and sometimes muttering so much that you couldn't make out what they were saying. The language was colloquial, the film was lit like the real world, the actors didn't look like actors." (Review of Ken Loach's Kes)

My favourite film: Kes

"None of us had kestrels, but we all related to the film. Most fictional kids we'd seen on the telly were posh and public-school, like Tom Brown. But Kes wasn't about privilege – just the opposite. Working-class boys speaking in working-class accents, and sometimes muttering so much that you couldn't make out what they were saying. The language was colloquial, the film was lit like the real world, the actors didn't look like actors." (Review of Ken Loach's Kes)

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