Boiled linseed oil is a simple and effective way to revive old wood for fresh paint or create a stunning old school finish for your projects.

Boiled linseed oil is a simple and effective way to revive old wood for fresh paint or create a stunning old school finish for your projects.

DIY: How To Make Oilcloth (and a cover for your iPod!) Great tutorial that shows you how to turn any material into oil cloth. Cheap and easy!

DIY: How To Make Oilcloth (and a cover for your iPod!) Great tutorial that shows you how to turn any material into oil cloth. Cheap and easy!

First, A Bit of Oil    You start by wiping on a very light coat of boiled linseed oil. Apply just enough to darken the wood and then wipe off any excess. When applied sparingly, the linseed oil will simply cure under the following coats of shellac and varnish. I like the way it brings out a beautiful, warm color in most woods. The change is immediate and pretty dramatic.

First, A Bit of Oil You start by wiping on a very light coat of boiled linseed oil. Apply just enough to darken the wood and then wipe off any excess. When applied sparingly, the linseed oil will simply cure under the following coats of shellac and varnish. I like the way it brings out a beautiful, warm color in most woods. The change is immediate and pretty dramatic.

100 year old recipe I found on youtube: A pound of beeswax, cut up to speed melting. Then take it off the flame and add 8oz of boiled linseed oil and 8oz of turpentine. Stir continuously. As it becomes a paste scoop in to a sealable container. For use on canvas, leather, wood and metal. Waterproofs and protects.

100 year old recipe I found on youtube: A pound of beeswax, cut up to speed melting. Then take it off the flame and add 8oz of boiled linseed oil and 8oz of turpentine. Stir continuously. As it becomes a paste scoop in to a sealable container. For use on canvas, leather, wood and metal. Waterproofs and protects.

3 Reasons Why I Don't Use Polyurethane

3 Reasons Why I Don't Use Polyurethane

Polyurethane is too finicky, the application is difficult and it doesn't give the look I want for my projects. You can make an easy DIY top coat instead!

To nourish the leather, feed it a “hide food.” Mix one part white vinegar with two parts linseed oil, shake well, and apply to the leather using a soft cloth. Work in a circular motion, covering the entire surface. Rub in thoroughly, let it sit for about 10 minutes, then buff with a soft cloth to bring a shine to the leather surface. You may need to buff once more before sitting on the furniture.

Tips for Cleaning Leather Upholstery

To nourish the leather, feed it a “hide food.” Mix one part white vinegar with two parts linseed oil, shake well, and apply to the leather using a soft cloth. Work in a circular motion, covering the entire surface. Rub in thoroughly, let it sit for about 10 minutes, then buff with a soft cloth to bring a shine to the leather surface. You may need to buff once more before sitting on the furniture.

If you have ever wanted to try oil painting, this three-article series will take you through the entire process step-by-step, from what supplies you will need to have, to how to prepare a canvas, choose a subject and paint your first painting. In this first article, you’ll learn what type of canvas, paints, mediums and other supplies you will need to get started.

Beginner's Guide to Oil Painting: Article 1 of 3

If you have ever wanted to try oil painting, this three-article series will take you through the entire process step-by-step, from what supplies you will need to have, to how to prepare a canvas, choose a subject and paint your first painting. In this first article, you’ll learn what type of canvas, paints, mediums and other supplies you will need to get started.

Awesome! The oil blends the pastels almost working like an eraser. Another winner with the kiddos.

Experiment with Oil Pastels by Adding Baby Oil

Awesome! The oil blends the pastels almost working like an eraser. Another winner with the kiddos.

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