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Types of Spirals.Logarithmic Spiral - self-similar spiral curve which often appears in Nature. Spira Mirabilis, Latin for “miraculous spiral”, is another name for the Logarithmic Spiral. The size of the spiral increases but its shape is unaltered with each successive curve, a property known as Self-Similarity. Possibly as a result of this unique property, the Spira Mirabilis has evolved in Nature, appearing in certain growing forms such as nautilus shells and sunflower heads. Fer...

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Logarithmic spiral--my snail tattoo "the size of the spiral increases but its shape is unaltered with each successive curve, a property known as self-similarity"

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The Fibonacci spiral is considered a logarithmic spiral, which are found everywhere in nature. Jakob Bernouli, a mathematician from a great family of brilliant people, called the logarithmic spiral spira mirabilis, or "the Miraculous Spiral," so called because the size increases but its shape is unaltered with each successive curve. This kind of spiral shows up in shells, in hurricanes, in flowers and even in the human body!

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Logarithmic spiral: "A logarithmic spiral, equiangular spiral or growth spiral is a special kind of spiral curve which often appears in nature." // Seen in: nautilus shell, Romanesco broccoli, weather patterns, space (spiral galaxies)

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from The Colossal Shop

Nautilus

Created as part of Rafael Araujo's Calculations series, Nautilus brings the logarithmic spirals of the famous cephalopod swirling to life in a precise field of three-dimensional space. #colossal

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lunar cycles; Marine scientists review the various mechanisms by which fish are able to align their reproductive cycles with phases of the moon.

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from WIRED

Earth’s Most Stunning Natural Fractal Patterns

Romanesco Broccoli "This variant form of cauliflower is the ultimate fractal vegetable. Its pattern is a natural representation of the Fibonacci or golden spiral, a logarithmic spiral where every quarter turn is farther from the origin by a factor of phi, the golden ratio."

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