The Lyrid Meteor Shower, observed for more than 2,000 years when the planet makes its annual passage through the dust stream of long-period Comet Thatcher. A grain of that comet's dust is swept up in this image from the early hours of April 21, 2015, the meteor's brilliant streak crosses the central region of the Milky Way. Its trail points back toward the constellation Lyra. The yellowish hue of giant star Antares shines to the above of the Milky Way's bulge. At the top is bright planet…

Lyrid Meteor Shower, observed when the planet makes its annual passage through the dust stream of long-period Comet Thatcher. image from April

Astrophotographer Jeff Berkes captured this Lyrid meteor in the marshlands of southern Maryland on April 14, 2013. (http://www.jeffberkesphotography.com/)

Lyrid Meteor Shower Peaks Tonight: How To Watch Live. Lyrid Meteor Shower Peaks Tonight: How To Watch Live

Lyrid Meteor Shower 2013~~tko

This here is from 4 days of photographing during the Lyrid Meteor shower of I went to 2 different locations, Torrance Barrens, Ontario, Canada and Algo.

2014 Lyrid meteor shower to peak on Earth Day -- #meteor #lyrid #space

Lyrid meteor shower to peak on Earth Day

Learn more about the annual Lyrid meteor shower. Image uploaded April Lyrid meteors appear to emanate from the star Vega in the constellation Lyra, the Harp.

Lyrid Meteor Shower 2012: Brian Emfinger  Credit: Brian Emfinger  Skywatcher and photographer Brian Emfinger captured this magnificent Lyrid fireball with the Milky Way in the background from Ozark, Ark., during the April 21-22 peak of the 2012 Lyrid meteor shower.

Lyrid Meteor Shower Brian Emfinger Credit: Brian Emfinger Skywatcher and photographer Brian Emfinger captured this magnificent Lyrid fireball with the Milky Way in the background from Ozark, Ark., during the April peak of the 2012 Lyrid meteor shower.

Astrophotographer Mark Lissick sent in a photo of Lyrid meteors and the Milky Way, taken on April 22, 2013, in Hope Valley, CA (near Lake Tahoe). Credit: Mark Lissick/Wildlight Nature Photography

The online Slooh community observatory will host a live views of the annual Lyrid meteor shower tonight, April beginning at 8 p. Here's how to watch.

Lyrid meteor shower .... this weekend!

Lyrid Meteor Shower Peaks This Week

The Lyrid meteor showers peak in the late hours of Saturday, April 21 and early hours of Sunday, April Eyes to the sky, my loves!

Every year in late April you can experience the Lyrids meteor shower.

At the end of a day devoted to Earth, people can look to the heavens for a beautiful shower of Lyrid meteors.

The Lyrids meteor shower are usually active between April 16 and April 25 every year. It tends to peak around April 22 or April 23.  Considered to be the oldest known meteor shower, the Lyrids are named after constellation Lyra. The radiant point of the shower - the point in the sky where the meteors seem to emerge from - lies near the star Vega, one of the brightest stars in the sky during this time of the year.

Stunning Lyrids Over Earth at Night With Star Field (NASA, International Space Station, by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

Meteor over Crater Lake, Oregon and our Milky Way galaxy in background!

Meteor over Crater Lake, Oregon. I saw this lake flying over Oregon in a plane. You can hike around it if you go to Crater Lake National Park

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