Margaret Bourke-White becomes the first female photojournalist to be allowed into combat zones—paving the way for women in the field of photography.

Margaret Bourke-White becomes the first female photojournalist to be allowed into combat zones—paving the way for women in the field of photography.

Man tightening the large nuts on the turbine shell of the Dneprostroi Hydroelectric Plant near Zaporizhia, Soviet Union (now Ukraine), 1930. By Margaret Bourke-White  #photography @Qomomolo

Man tightening the large nuts on the turbine shell of the Dneprostroi Hydroelectric Plant near Zaporizhia, Soviet Union (now Ukraine), 1930. By Margaret Bourke-White #photography @Qomomolo

Margaret Bourke-White ,self portrait, 1931.  (born  Margaret White , June 14, 1904 The Bronx, – died  August 27, 1971 (aged 67) Stamford, Connecticut ,of Parkinson's disease) was an American photographer and documentary photographer. She is best known as the first foreign photographer permitted to take pictures of Soviet industry, the first American female war photojournalist, and the first female photographer for Henry Luce's Life magazine, where her photograph appeared on the first cover.

Margaret Bourke-White ,self portrait, 1931. (born Margaret White , June 14, 1904 The Bronx, – died August 27, 1971 (aged 67) Stamford, Connecticut ,of Parkinson's disease) was an American photographer and documentary photographer. She is best known as the first foreign photographer permitted to take pictures of Soviet industry, the first American female war photojournalist, and the first female photographer for Henry Luce's Life magazine, where her photograph appeared on the first cover.

'Parachute', 1937 by Margaret Bourke-White.  Part of a photographic sequence of parachutes being tested by employees of Irving Air Chute Company in Buffalo, New York, the world's largest manufacturer of parachutes.

'Parachute', 1937 by Margaret Bourke-White. Part of a photographic sequence of parachutes being tested by employees of Irving Air Chute Company in Buffalo, New York, the world's largest manufacturer of parachutes.

Margaret Bourke-White: Gold Miners, Johannesburg, South Africa, 1950   At the end of 1949, LIFE magazine sent Margaret Bourke-White on assignment to South Africa for a few months. There, in a gold mine near Johannesburg, at a depth of nearly 5000 feet (1500 m) and in blistering heat, she made the photograph of the two black miners drenched in sweat - a photograph that she herself declared to be one of her favourite pictures.

Margaret Bourke-White: Gold Miners, Johannesburg, South Africa, 1950 At the end of 1949, LIFE magazine sent Margaret Bourke-White on assignment to South Africa for a few months. There, in a gold mine near Johannesburg, at a depth of nearly 5000 feet (1500 m) and in blistering heat, she made the photograph of the two black miners drenched in sweat - a photograph that she herself declared to be one of her favourite pictures.

Pinterest
Search